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APPENDIX F
AIR FORCE T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
You can see this is a common framework for solving all situational EPs. We will call this the
"Mantra" of EPs. When called on to solve an EP, this should be the first thing out of the
student's mouth, so the student must memorize it. After you spit it out, you must then apply it.
HOW TO HANDLE A "STAND-UP" EP SCENARIO
Do not begin an emergency situation until you are absolutely sure you know the entire set up.
If there is anything that you are unsure of--ask. Some things that you might think about asking
are the weather conditions (nearest VFR), whether you are solo, the runway that day, what
attitude your aircraft is in, or what the alternate is if the weather requires it. Only after you have
a handle on the setup should you say, "Roger, I have the controls." ("aircraft" in the Air Force.)
MAINTAIN AIRCRAFT CONTROL
This is the most important step in handling any situation. Be specific. Think about what
attitude your aircraft is in and make appropriate control inputs to correct to wings level.
Sometimes maintaining aircraft control may mean just continuing the current attitude until the
EP is analyzed. Do not get too far ahead of the aircraft, only talk about how you are going to
maintain aircraft control in the next 6-9 seconds.
ANALYZE THE SITUATION AND TAKE PROPER ACTION
At this point, the airplane stops in space and you can take your time to completely analyze the
problem. Use your combined knowledge of systems, emergency procedures, and the Master
Caution/Warning system to help you analyze the situation.
A. To analyze the situation:
1. Check your engine instruments.
2. Punch off the Master Caution light.
3. Check the Master Caution Warning panel. Do not base your decisions solely on what
the panel says.
4. Refer back to the engine instruments and confirm what the panel is telling you.
5. Use your senses (sight, feel, sound, smell) and Wingman to analyze everything else
inside and outside the cockpit.
6. Determine what the problem is.
B. Take proper action:
1. Accomplish any critical action procedures, called BOLDFACE in the Air Force, by
first stating the BOLDFACE, then describe how you are going to apply the
BOLDFACE procedures to the situation, and finally open the checklist to the proper
page. Accomplish any non-critical action by first referring to the proper page in your
checklist.
F-2


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