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AIR FORCE T-38 TRACK INTERMEDIATES
APPENDIX F
2. Finish all the checklist items. Use the guide at the end of your checklist to see what
other checklists apply. Finally, do not forget to look through the "blue brains" (in-
flight guide) to see if anything applies.
3. Do not forget your normal checks.
LAND AS SOON AS CONDITIONS PERMIT
It is important to note that "as soon as conditions permit" does not mean immediately. Some
situations will require you to return straight back to land. Realize that checklists can be run on
the way back to the field. Do not continue to fly away from a suitable field or maintain your area
as you work the problem. An overall plan can and should be stated early on in the EP while
checklists are being referenced.
A. Get headed towards an appropriate landing site.
B. Decide which runway to land on.
C. Call the FDO (Supervisor of Flying (SOF) in the Air Force). Notice where this step is.
When the EP is under control and you have accomplished all your checklists, call him up
and tell him what your indications were, what you did, and what your game plan is.
D. Land. The EP is not finished until you take the situation to a logical conclusion.
ONCE ON THE GROUND
The EP is not over until the aircraft is shut down. You should think about the following when
finally on the ground:
A. Did you declare an emergency? If you opened up the EP Checklist pages to handle the
problem, you probably should have. If you did declare an emergency, remember that the
fire chief is the only one that can terminate the emergency. Decide whether you can clear
the runway or need to stop straight ahead. Relay this to the fire chief through the tower.
B. Is it critical to get out right away? If the A/C is on fire, if you have a fuel leak, etc., you
should consider emergency ground egress.  However, do not complicate a benign
situation by rushing out of the aircraft for something like a gear malfunction.
C. Rule of thumb to decide whether you can clear the runway:
1.
Good engine.
2.
Good brakes/tires.
3.
Gear handle down (no red light indications).
4.
Three good gear indications (down and locked).
If you can answer yes to all of the above and do not have a situation requiring an emergency
ground egress, you may taxi clear.
So there you have it in a nutshell. While it is not "fun" to do stand-ups, they are an integral
part of preparing to handle an emergency while airborne. Attached is a memory guide you can
use here at Whiting while doing a "stand-up" in the AF formation program. Good luck!
F-3


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