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APPENDIX F
STAND-UP EMERGENCY PROCEDURES GUIDE
This section will help you get up to speed before going to Air Force follow-on training. The
whole idea, of course, is to give the student exposure to the most realistic scenario possible, not
merely asking what the critical action procedures are. Knowing the procedures verbatim does
not imply an ability to apply them in a critical situation or effectively reason out a safe approach
to an EP with other factors such as weather.
All situational EPs start when you notice something amiss with the aircraft or notice a caution
light. This is the moment that the student is given the aircraft to solve the EP. This usually
happens in the flight brief before flying, but can also be given in the debrief or during a
routine/checkride ground eval. In Air Force JSUPT, the student will get this situational EP
during the morning mass brief before the flying schedule starts (at a minimum) and it will start
after the USEM* gives a scenario and then calls on a student to solve the EP. The student then
stands up in front of all his peers and IPs and solves the EP. He remains standing until the EP
has been brought to a successful conclusion or is "sat down" by the USEM for failing to come up
with a viable solution. It is then handed to another student to "stand-up" and start from where
the previous student left off. The new student has the chance to correct or change anything the
previous student had done, and then continue from that point until final solution, generally
defined as the point you have exited the aircraft and are on the ground (to include by parachute!)
There are a few common traits that all EPs have: you have got to come up with a solution,
execute it, and hopefully walk away to fly another day.  To help us accomplish this, the
NATOPS (or "DASH-1" in the Air Force) manual gives us a format to logically bring an EP to a
conclusion. This format is located on the first page of section 5, the EP section of the T-34C
NATOPS, and is as follows:
1.
Aircraft Control Maintain
2.
Precise Nature of the problem Determine
3.
Applicable Emergency procedures Execute
4.
Appropriate Landing Criteria Determine and Execute
The Air Force version is similar:
1.
Maintain aircraft control
2.
Analyze the situation
3.
Take appropriate action
4.
Land as soon as conditions a permit
*USEM: Unit Stan/Eval Manager, the one who gives you the EP*
F-1


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