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T-6A CONTACT
CHAPTER FIVE
NOTE
Your instructor may want you to practice a few shallow turns in
this configuration prior to continuing. Remember, you will see this
nose attitude on the downwind leg when you begin practicing the
landing pattern.
5.
Lower landing flaps. As airspeed approaches 110 KIAS, advance power ~50% and
stabilize in the landing flap approach configuration. Trim.
6.
Complete the Before Landing Checklist.
7.
Advance power to maximum, check airspeed below 150 KIAS, and raise the gear and flaps
up. Trim for acceleration.
8.
Accelerate to normal cruise. As airspeed approaches 200 KIAS, reduce power to ~54%.
9.
Retrim as necessary to remove all pressures from the flight controls and check the balance
ball centered.
517.
STALL TRAINING
Stalls are taught to develop your ability to recognize a complete stall or an approaching stall and
to recover correctly with a minimum loss of altitude. Stall training is an integral part of your
contact training. The recognition and recovery skills developed here may someday save your life.
Read and review "Stall Characteristics" in the NATOPS, Chapter 6, and pay close attention to
discussions on the stick shaker, power-on vs. power-off stalls, and the stall recovery.
Prior to commencing any intentional stalls, spins, or aerobatics, complete the Pre-Stalling,
Spinning, and Aerobatic Checks, per the NATOPS and the In-flight Guide. Recovery from all
practice stall maneuvers shall be completed by 6000 feet AGL.
518.
POWER-OFF STALL
The power off stall is taught to demonstrate the approach-to-stall recovery technique when power
is not available. This stall could occur, for example, during a dead-engine glide to high key.
After becoming distracted, the pilot fails to maintain proper flying speed and the aircraft
approaches the stalled angle of attack. In this situation, the only way to recover is with a nose
attitude correction since power is unavailable. Initiate the recovery at the first indication of an
impending stall.
We use 4 to 6 percent torque to simulate the feathered condition while practicing this maneuver.
Best glide speed in the clean configuration is approximately 125 KIAS with a sink rate of 1100 to
1300 feet per minute. Pay close attention to the glide portion of this procedure before the stall.
This will probably be your first look at flight in the (simulated) feathered condition. Note the
nose attitude and flight characteristics of the airplane when flying the power-off best glide speed.
FLIGHT PROCEDURES
5-13


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