Quantcast Power-Off Stall Procedures

 

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CHAPTER FIVE
T-6A CONTACT
After the recovery, you will return to this attitude and airspeed to complete the maneuver.
519.
POWER-OFF STALL PROCEDURES
1.
Establish the aircraft in the normal cruise configuration (200 KIAS).
2.
Perform the Pre-Stalling, Spinning, and Aerobatic Checks.
3.
Reduce power to 4 to 6 percent torque and begin decelerating towards best glide speed.
4.
While decelerating, commence a level clearing turn of 180 using 45 AOB. Assertively
trim nose up for the deceleration.
5.
As airspeed approaches 125 KIAS, lower nose to the 125-knot glide attitude (approximately
horizon bisecting windscreen) and stabilize the glide. Retrim.
6.
Smoothly raise the nose to level 8 to 10 degrees nose high. Smoothly increase back stick
pressure to hold this nose attitude until the first indication of an impending stall (i.e., airframe
stall buffet or stick shaker).
NOTE
Do not initiate the recovery at the landing gear position warning
which, if not manually silenced, will sound with airspeed below
120 KIAS and N1 less than 87%.
7.
Recover by relaxing back stick pressure, lowering the nose to "slightly below" the 125-KIAS
glide attitude. Check wings level and hold this nose attitude, allowing airspeed to increase towards
125 KIAS.
8.
Re-establish 125-KIAS glide. Retrim as necessary to remove all pressures from the flight
controls and check the balance ball centered.
520.
APPROACH TURN STALL
The approach turn stall (ATS) is taught to develop your skill at recognizing and recovering with
minimum loss of altitude from an impending stall in the final turn. The ATS maneuver simulates
a transition from downwind to a TO-flap approach turn in which poor airwork leads to an
impending stall and recovery.
Aircraft are particularly vulnerable to an inadvertent stall in the final turn. The airplane is low to
the ground, configured (high drag), at a relatively low power setting, and in a potentially very
distracting flight environment. Diligent aircraft control and airspeed management will help
prevent a potential stall from progressing. Anytime during the final turn, if you encounter
approach-to-stall indications, such as the stick shaker or airframe stall buffet, you should
immediately recover the aircraft and waveoff, as appropriate.
5-14
FLIGHT PROCEDURES


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