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CHAPTER THREE
RADIO INSTRUMENTS
Surveillance Final Approach
A Surveillance Final Approach (ASR) is a non-precision approach, which is most often utilized
when a precision approach is not available. There may be times when the precision radar
equipment is inoperative or not available for the landing runway. Under these conditions,
surveillance radar is used to furnish information required to align the aircraft with the approach
runway. Since, surveillance radar is not as accurate as precision radar and does not provide
elevation data, the landing minimums are higher than for precision approaches. Course
corrections are not as accurate as those corrections given during a precision approach because of
less precise radarscope presentations. At the MAP (normally about one mile from the runway),
the controller will advise the pilot to report the runway in sight or to perform the missed
approach. It is important to remember the controller cannot observe aircraft elevation during the
surveillance approach.
SAR instructions are similar to those received during the precision approach to the point of
establishing the descent. Although no glideslope information is provided, upon pilot request,
recommended altitudes are provided. The pilot should establish a rate of descent, which will
ensure reaching the minimum descent altitude (MDA) at or slightly before the MAP. If the
MDA is reached before the missed approach point, the aircraft will maintain MDA altitude until
the controller advises that the missed approach point has been reached.
The student will report 200 feet prior to the MDA and state the MDA: "200 feet prior to MDA:
460 feet."
At the MAP, the student will inquire "Runway in sight?"
If the answer is in the affirmative, the student will respond "Take over visually." If the answer is
negative, the student will respond by repeating Missed Approach Instructions, monitoring
commencement of the climb, commencement of the turn (if there is one), and commencement of
the "clean up," and then report the Missed Approach to the controlling agency, including a
statement of intentions or a request for clearance.
NOTES
1.
Several fields have established procedures for conducting a
"PAR Approach Without Glideslope". These approaches can be
identified in the RADAR INSTRUMENT APPROACH
MINIMUMS section in the front of High Altitude Instrument
Approach Procedures booklets.
2.
A "PAR Approach Without Glideslope" is essentially an
ASR approach using the PAR azimuth radar for course guidance.
Greater accuracy can be achieved and minimums are a bit better
than for ASR approaches to the same runway. These approaches
might be conducted in case of failure of elevation radar. If such an
approach is to be conducted, the aircraft will be advised: "This
3-42
RADIO INSTRUMENTS


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