Quantcast Out-Of-Control Flight Manuevers

 

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T-34C OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT
CHAPTER TWO
x.
Turning without interval.
xi.
Missed calls/Using UHF vice ICS.
xii. Lowering right wing vice using right rudder on liftoff from touch-and-go.
b.
Defensive techniques:
i.
Shadow the student on the controls. Do not ride the controls all the time, the
student needs an opportunity to make mistakes and learn to correct them on his
own or waveoff.
ii.
Do not overload the student to the point where they are task saturated on every
pass and lose Situational Awareness (SA) because this may help keep them
from doing something unexpected.
Only by teaching and developing defensive positioning techniques, can we expect our instructors
to be able to prevent any situation from developing beyond their ability to correct it. Defensive
positioning training will improve our reaction time by allowing us to "feel" an improper input
and act correctly, or not allow the improper input to be accomplished at all if that is the suitable
thing to do. It is just as important to recognize an unsafe situation developing and prevent it
from happening, as it is to properly assess an OCF regime and recover from it correctly.
A good example of defensive positioning occurs during an ATS (especially to the left) when the
student's tendency (read, "Common Errors") is to apply left rudder vice the correct input of right
rudder. By placing your right foot over, not specifically on, the right rudder pedal, you can
prevent the SNA inadvertent input with an artificial stop. This prevents the dreaded Approach
Turn spin. Other examples include "guarding" the rudder pedals during HAPL/LAPL work to
prevent a slip from becoming a skid or keeping your hand behind the stick during takeoffs and
landings to prevent overrotation, overflare or pushover after ballooning.
Defensive positioning must be an integral part of the Instructor Training Syllabus to be instilled
effectively in all of our flight instructors prior to "hitting the pits".
210. OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT MANEUVERS
1.
Cross-Control Departure
a.
Description: The Cross-Control Departure is a basic flight departure maneuver
designed to demonstrate how a combination of high AOA, Angle of Bank (AOB),
and excessive yaw rate can lead to an inadvertent loss of control.
b.
General: The maneuver will be entered by the Standardization Instructor and
recovered by the IUT. Once established in straight-and-level flight, the aircraft will
be rolled into a steep AOB. Back stick and top rudder pressure will be applied as
power is retarded toward idle, ensuring entry airspeed is below 120 KIAS. Once a
2-14 UNUSUAL ATTITUDES AND OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT


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