Quantcast Landing Pattern Defensive Positioning

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Landing Pattern Defensive Positioning
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



CHAPTER TWO
T-34C OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT
b.
If a student selects a bad, unprepared field (one that you really can not land in if you
lost the engine), you may let him go to the bad field, but not to the point where you
know you will not be able to make some other good field you have in sight. You do
not want to be in a situation where you are out of altitude and options, have an actual
emergency, and you have set yourself up to prove a point.
c.
During waveoff from a High Altitude Power Loss (HAPL)/Low Altitude Power Loss
(LAPL), there should never be a question about who is doing the waveoff. It will
always be the instructor; therefore, you should take the controls with enough altitude
so that you do not descend below the waveoff altitude. When taking the controls
from the student, anticipate the aircraft being untrimmed, add power, level the wings,
and center the ball. Use the same Waveoff Procedures that are in the Contact FTI.
When climbing out, you should climb for a suitable low key in case of an actual
emergency.
5.
Landing Pattern Defensive Positioning
Landing Pattern errors are contained in the Contact FTI. However, as an instructor, it is
important you maintain a vigilant scan and good situational awareness while in a high traffic
environment where your attention will be divided between trying to teach a young aviator how to
land and knowing where your interval is. Do not trust the student to do this. It is important to
note that students will have bad landings (some more than others) and that is all right. Your task
as an instructor is to know what a bad landing is and what an unsafe landing is; the first is part of
the learning curve, the latter should be waved off. In this syllabus, you will see examples of both
and learn where that line is so that you do not cross it.
a.
Typical errors include:
i.
Not trimming throughout pattern.
ii.
Balloon-fast on final and over flare.
iii.
Porpoise landing-correct by waveoff.
iv.
Stall prior to touch down.
v.
Overshoot/Undershoot final.
vi.
Low/High.
vii. Slow/Fast.
viii. Poor crosswind correction/Crab landing.
ix.
Late/Early transition at the 180 position.
UNUSUAL ATTITUDES AND OUT-OF-CONTROL FLIGHT 2-13


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +