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APPENDIX A
T-34C INSTRUMENTS
A103. FUEL MANAGEMENT
Fuel management is accomplished in two phases: (1) preflight planning, and (2) inflight
monitoring and updating. Preflight planning may be accomplished using the jetlog fuel plan you
were taught in IFR ground school. Additionally, you should familiarize yourself with Section 11
of the T­34C NATOPS Manual which contains aircraft performance data. Utilize this section as
necessary in your planning.
During the flight, you should check the accuracy of your fuel planning by comparing the fuel on
board with the jet log estimates for your enroute fixes. Should predicted and actual fuel usage
vary significantly, recompute your fuel plan. Monitor the fuel flow gauge and compare it with
the predicted flow. Check for fuel splits and take corrective action as necessary.
If at any point you doubt your ability to reach your destination (or alternate) with required
reserves, modify your flight plan and request ATC assistance as necessary. DO NOT BE A
VICTIM OF "GET­HOME­ ITIS!!"
A104. EMERGENCY FIELD SELECTION
As in VFR flying, a good Radio Instrument pilot is always looking for suitable landing fields in
the event of an emergency. Under IMC, factors that determine field suitability include approach
availability, lighting (if at night), runway length, and availability of maintenance services
(depending on the urgency of the situation). The IFR enroute chart depicts those aerodromes
with a DOD published instrument approach procedure in dark blue. The chart also gives field
elevation, runway length, and lighting information. To further determine whether the approaches
are compatible with your NAVAIDS you should be aware of the suitable fields that lie along
your intended route of flight. If an emergency occurs, after taking the immediate action
prescribed by NATOPS, you will contact ATC with your situation and intentions. If necessary,
ATC can assist in the selection of and navigation to the nearest suitable field.
A105. ENROUTE WEATHER INFORMATION
Once airborne and established on your route of flight, it is prudent to get a weather update, not
only for your intended landing field, but also for weather between your present position and
destination. This information is most easily obtained from a Pilot­to­Metro facility. A
discussion of this service is contained in the FIH. Also helpful can be FSS, radio call sign "(FSS
Name) RADIO." These can be identified on the IFR charts by the heavy shadow over the
air/ground communication boxes. FSS may provide weather advisories, but are not certified
weather forecasters. Some selected NAVAIDS have Transcribed Weather Enroute Broadcast
and Hazardous Inflight Weather Advisory Service transmitted on the VOR ­ see the IFR Enroute
Chart legend.
A106. LOST COMMUNICATIONS
Refer to Procedures for Two­way Radio Failure in the Instrument Flight Rules Course;
Emergency Procedures section of FIH.
A-2 SUPPLEMENTARY FLIGHT PROCEDURES AND EMERGENCY ROCEDURES


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