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T-34C INSTRUMENTS
APPENDIX A
Two­way radio failure and surrounding circumstances are so varied that exact procedures to be
followed may not be covered in every situation. In an attempt to cover the majority of situations
that will be encountered, the FAA has published specific procedures (FAR 91) that must be
complied with and with which all pilots shall be familiar. These procedures are available to the
pilot in flight in the Emergency Procedures Section of the FIH. When confronted with a
situation not covered in the handbook, the pilot is expected to exercise good judgment in
whatever action he/she elects to take. Under any circumstances, the pilot should guard all
available communications frequencies, and, if so equipped, set the transponder in accordance
with procedures prescribed in the FIH.
A107. UNINTENTIONAL THUNDERSTORM PENETRATION
See NIFM 8­6, T­34C NATOPS Chapter 18.
The first and most important rule about thunderstorms is to avoid them and to avoid any area
where they may be found. Should unintentional thunderstorm penetration occur, follow the
NATOPS "Thunderstorms and Turbulent Air Procedures." Additionally:
1.
Fly attitude. Do not attempt to chase every variation in the altimeter or airspeed indicator.
The information they give in a thunderstorm, especially in relation to pitch angles, is often
unreliable. Fly the attitude indicator and let the aircraft's inherent stability do its job. It will be
impossible to maintain altitude. Do not attempt it. Instead, concentrate on maintaining a straight
and level attitude.
2.
Do not reverse course. An attempt to do a 180º turn in the most severe part of a
thunderstorm could put the aircraft in serious jeopardy. The aircraft loses some of its stability in
a turn, it is easier for the pilot to become disoriented, and the chances are he is already more than
halfway through the storm when he makes the decision to turn.
A108. ICING
Refer to the NATOPS "Inflight Icing" section. Intentional flight into or during icing conditions
is prohibited in the T­34C.
Since instrument flight may involve prolonged operation through areas of visible moisture, it is
imperative to note the outside air temperature, particularly during climbs and descents, and to
avoid entering icing conditions. The pitot heater, windshield defogger, and engine air bypass
door are the only devices available to combat icing, and are of limited value in removing ice.
Use them when entering visible moisture before ice has a chance to accumulate. Fly over, under,
or around any known icing conditions when at all possible. If ice has formed despite all
precautions, land as soon as possible. Increase your airspeed during the approach to maintain
positive control of the aircraft. Consider a no­flap landing.
SUPPLEMENTARY FLIGHT PROCEDURES AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES A-3


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