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T-34C CONTACT
CHAPTER ONE
in difficult periods. The student who discovers that he or she does not enjoy flying but remains
because of prestige or monetary compensation will find that his or her chances of successfully
completing the program are poor. The desire to earn those coveted wings of gold and the love of
flying provide the highest motivation and the greatest likelihood of success.
With these basic qualities as a foundation, the experience you gain as you progress through each
stage of your training will develop the many facets of your skill and judgment. This will allow
you to cope with the many and varied problems that may confront you in the handling of your
aircraft under all conditions. Although your instructor and other personnel are at your disposal to
help solve various problems, your own intelligent analysis, based on acquired knowledge, will
generally permit you to arrive at correct and logical conclusions.
The technique of flying is a highly physical attribute and, like many other acts of a physical
nature, is mostly a matter of coordination of hands, feet and eyes. As far as controlling the
attitude and performance of the aircraft is concerned, the elementary techniques of flying are not
at all difficult to master. But, because it is performed in an environment to which you will not be
accustomed, you may experience some difficulty adapting to the airborne classroom. With your
instructor's patience and your own hard work and alertness, the readjustment required will occur
naturally and you will find that the T-34C is one of the most enjoyable classrooms in the world.
Every student should remember these guidelines when managing his/her training program.
1.
Your flight instructor wants you to learn to be a professional aviator. If in doubt, ask
questions and use your flight instructor to help you through problem areas.
2.
Preparation is the key to professionalism. Do not be satisfied with only knowing enough to
complete the hop. What is being taught in the primary phase has a direct transference to all
future training.
Remember one important thing for as long as you fly an aircraft: You must be your own most
aggressive critic. This does not mean that you become a mental case in the cockpit, but it does
mean that as an aviator beginning the flight training syllabus, you must demonstrate one of the
most critical qualities a professional aviator has: self-discipline. This means that you prepare for
every hop as if your professional reputation is at stake. Your flights are not contests where
someone is keeping score and counting your mistakes. Your flight grades should not be as
important as your own honest appraisal of your flight performance. You are expected to come
well prepared, but you must expect to make mistakes. Most of these mistakes are forgiven as
long as you deal with them professionally, on the spot and learn from them. That is why they
call this flight training.
108.
TRAINING TIME OUT
CNETINST 1500.20 (series), enclosure (3) defines the conditions under which a Training Time
Out (TTO) may be requested. It states in part, "A TTO may be called in any training situation
whenever a student or instructor expresses concern for personal safety or a need for clarification
of procedures or requirements exists. . . . "
INTRODUCTION TO T-34C CONTACT 1-7


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