Quantcast Crew Resource Management - P-330_wch50022

 

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CHAPTER ONE
T-34C CONTACT
The intent of TTO is to give students and instructors the means to stop a flight if they are not
"communicating" or if either party feels they are in an unsafe position. It will not be used to
terminate a flight just because you are having a bad day or do not know your procedures.
Nevertheless, do not be hesitant to use TTO if you feel the flight conditions warrant it.
109.
CREW RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
The "Human Error" factor or inadequate aircrew coordination is the single leading cause factor
for Class A mishaps in modern naval aviation. Crew Resource Management (CRM) describes
the process of coordinated action among crew members, which enables them to interact
effectively while performing mission tasks.
CRM has become an essential element in the Navy's commitment to minimize the contribution
of human error to aviation mishaps. The major emphasis on CRM will occur in the intermediate
phase of training. Here in primary flight training, our mission precludes us from utilizing the
variety of CRM skills to their maximum potential. This is mainly due to the instructor/student
relationship adhered to for standardization and training purposes.
1.
Sandbag Syndrome. The sandbag syndrome is based on a comforting premise that one or
more other crew members have the situation under control and are looking out for your best
interest. It is mainly experienced at certain times when the instructor pilot has assumed flying
duties, such as breaks in training, approaches, enroute transits, etc. This effectively results in the
SNA being "along for the ride."  It is important to remember that no pilot is above the
momentary lapse of judgment or situational awareness that could result in a flight violation or
mishap. Do not let this happen to you! As a copilot, your primary responsibility is to support
and back up the pilot at the controls.
Stay alert and speak up when necessary.  The instructor/student relationship often fosters
reluctance on the part of the SNA to confront the Instructor Pilot (IP). But remember, do not let
misplaced professional courtesies stand in the way of maintaining safe and efficient flying
practices.
2.
"I'm Safe" Checklist. As a rule, good aircrew coordination begins with the individual
crew member. Our situational awareness resources might be lacking before we even set foot in
the cockpit. Unfortunately, we do not have external readouts telling ourselves when they are
diminished. Therefore, it is important that every pilot conduct a daily personal preflight prior to
each flight. "I'M SAFE" is a simple checklist to determine if we are ready and fit to fly. Do not
show up for a brief without first conducting a personal preflight.
I
Illness (Do you feel well?)
M
Medication (Are you feeling any effects of medications taken?)
S
Stress (Are there any adverse stresses in your life to distract you?)
A
Alcohol (Are you free of all effects of alcohol consumed?)
F
Fatigue (Are you well rested?)
E
Eating (Did you eat properly before flying?)
1-8
INTRODUCTION TO T-34C CONTACT


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