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CHAPTER SIX
T-34C CONTACT
MAX ALLOWABLE POWER
Torque set to 1015 ft-lbs.,
monitor ITT so as not to exceed 695º C
Prop RPM 2200±25
WINGTIP DISTANCES
One wingtip
­wingtip
¾ wingtip
­outboard aileron hinge
wingtip
­middle aileron hinges
½ wingtip
­fuel cap
wingtip
­fuel cell access panel
inboard of fuel cap
¼ wingtip
­between wing root and
fuel access panel (also the
double row of rivets)
602.
INSTRUMENT, GAS AND POSITION REPORTS
Instrument, fuel (gas) and position (IGP) reports will be performed at least every 15-20 minutes
during all flights. The student will check all engine instruments for normal indications, the
purpose of which is the early detection of any engine malfunction. The fuel quantity in each tank
is checked in order to detect excessive fuel consumption or uneven fuel flow. Determine your
position by reference to checkpoints on the ground, preferably a paved runway. It is of vital
importance that the student be aware of his or her position at all times during the flight. If unsure
of prominent landmarks during early stage Contact flights, ask your instructor to point them out.
The following is an example of the IGP report:
"Engine instruments normal, fuel is 250 lbs. left tank, 250 lbs. right tank and our position is
______."
603.
ASSUMING CONTROL OF THE AIRCRAFT
It is critical to flight safety that a pilot be at the controls of the aircraft at all times. A
misunderstanding between two pilots as to who is actively controlling the aircraft could become
a causal factor in a mishap. Therefore, you must be knowledgeable of the procedures involved in
transferring controls. Throughout your flying career, you will fly with many pilots of various
experience levels and backgrounds. To avoid miscommunication, all pilots transfer the controls
the same way, regardless of platform.
Either pilot may initiate a change in control of the aircraft. It shall be accomplished by means of
a positive three-way exchange using the word "controls."
NOTE
Do not use the words "it," "aircraft," or "command" to refer to the
controls.
6-2 FLIGHT PROCEDURES


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