Quantcast Communications - P-330_wch50083

 

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T-34C CONTACT
CHAPTER SIX
For example, the instructor may initiate by telling you over the ICS, "I have the controls." You
will then acknowledge by saying over the ICS, "You have the controls." You will then take your
hands and feet off the controls and your instructor will confirm he has control by saying, "I have
the controls."
When your instructor wants you to take control, he will say, "You have the controls," whereupon
you will take control and acknowledge by saying over the ICS, "I have the controls." Your
instructor will complete the three-way exchange with, "You have the controls."
Stay on the controls and keep flying the aircraft until you are told to do otherwise. Never be in
doubt as to who is doing the flying. Always fly as if you are flying solo unless you know that the
instructor has control. The important thing is that a "demand and reply" series of responses is
used so that there is no question as to who is flying.
604.
Proper radio communication techniques are extremely important to safety when operating in
controlled airspace or the vicinity of other aircraft.  You should read and learn the basic
communication terminology/procedures explained in Appendix A. These procedures will be
used throughout your aviation career.  Appendix C contains information on the NATOPS
briefing required before every flight.
605.
NORMAL TAKEOFF
1.
Description. Takeoff is the movement of the aircraft from its starting point on the runway
until it leaves the ground in controlled flight.
2.
General. Since the takeoff requires both ground and in-flight operation, you must learn to
use the controls during the transition from ground movement to airborne flight with maximum
smoothness and coordination. Skill in blending these functions will improve your ability to
control the airplane's direction of movement on and from the runway. The takeoff itself,
although a relatively simple maneuver, often presents the most hazardous part of a flight.
Accident statistics show that takeoff accidents, although slightly less frequently occurring, are
much more tragic than landing accidents.
Takeoffs should always be made as nearly into the wind as practical. The airplane depends on
airspeed in order to fly. A headwind provides some of that airspeed, even with the airplane
motionless, by reason of wind flowing over the wings. The aircraft's groundspeed will be less
with a headwind and greater with a tailwind. Not only is a lower groundspeed safer, it reduces
wear and stress on the landing gear and results in a shorter ground roll. Therefore, much less
space is required to develop the minimum lift necessary for takeoff and climb.
FLIGHT PROCEDURES 6-3


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