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T-6A INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
CHAPTER SIX
MISSED APPROACH REVIEW
After completing the Before Landing Checklist, but prior to the MAP/DH, ask the IP if a review
of the missed approach/climbout instructions is required. In your review, you should make note
of the following PHA:
Point:
Point at which to execute the missed approach.
Heading:
First heading to turn.
Altitude:
First climb altitude.
The following is an example of a missed approach review.
"In the event of a missed approach, climb runway heading to 800 feet. At 2 DME, turn right
heading 180."
LANDING
One last report is required during the landing roll - the "rollout call." As the aircraft touches
down, reference the airspeed with the runway distance remaining at each 1000 foot marker
(board) and report this to your pilot. Make these calls until the airspeed is below 40 KIAS.
For example, "Five board, 80 KIAS, four board 60 KIAS" until below 40 KIAS.
AFTER LANDING
After exiting the runway, ensure you have your approach plate available to provide taxi
information to the IP on how to proceed to parking.
Complete After Landing and Engine Shutdown Checklists.
CONCLUSION
Your ability to successfully direct a flight through an instrument environment is one of the major
goals of instrument navigation training. All of your academic courses are aimed at providing
you with the tools to do so. For each flight, you must rehearse all your procedures from brief to
debrief. Do this as often as possible until you are 100% proficient with the required procedures
and be able to mentally visualize your route of flight ("chair fly"). This will help you
tremendously as you progress through the flight. The instrument flights will require you to
navigate the aircraft as well as to perform your normal cockpit procedures. As you progress
through the syllabus, there will be less involvement from the instructor and more of a
requirement for you to perform independently. Remember to think of yourself as the mission
commander and act like it. Direct the pilot to do everything. Take charge of each situation and
recommend a solution to conflicts. If your IP doesn't agree with it, he will let you know. The
more proactive you can be as a crewmember, the better your mission commander skills will
become. Someday the safety of you and your aircrew may depend on this training.
STUDENT SUPPLEMENTARY FLIGHT PROCEDURES
6-15


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