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CHAPTER FIVE
T-6A INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
NOTES
1.  In the landing minima section, large-type altitudes are MSL;
small-type are AGL.
2.  HAT is associated with straight-in approaches. HAA is
associated with circling approaches. MDA is associated with non-
precision (no glideslope) approaches.
3.  The T-6A is an Approach Category B aircraft based on
approach speed of 91 KIAS or more but less than 121 KIAS.
5.  The aerodrome data box is provided on each approach plate in the bottom corner. It shows
the runways, taxiways, control tower, vertical obstructions, and the field elevation. All
elevations are in feet above MSL. It may include other information such as approach lighting,
etc.
Note the station to field timing at the bottom of the aerodrome data box. This table is used to
determine the time to the MAP from the FAF at various GS. The student may estimate GS.
Example: With an approach speed of 120 KIAS and 15 KIAS of headwind, GS becomes 105
KIAS with timing of 4:22. Timing should always be used, when available, as a back up on DME
approaches in case the DME should fail. This is accomplished using the elapsed timer function
of the clock.
502. LOW ALTITUDE INSTRUMENT APPROACH
An instrument approach enables an aircraft to transition from instrument flight conditions to a
visual landing while providing terrain clearance and separation from other aircraft. There are a
number of low altitude initial approaches that may be executed with the navigation equipment in
the T-6, but the ultimate goal is to transition from the enroute environment to FAC for landing.
These include procedure turn, teardrop, holding pattern, straight-in, and arc and radial
combination approaches which use VOR, DME, GPS, ILS, or a combination thereof to complete
the approach. Radar vectors to FAC are an additional procedure, which may be applied to any of
the above approaches.
Prior to departure, familiarize yourself with the destination IAPs compatible with aircraft
NAVAIDs. Check the forecast weather conditions against the published weather minimums
listed on the approach plate and choose a suitable alternate if required. Enroute, review the
approach plates again. (See Appendix B for recommended approach plate review technique.)
ATC will switch you from enroute frequencies to terminal frequencies in the vicinity of your
destination.
5-4 TERMINAL PROCEDURES


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