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T-6A INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
APPENDIX D
NOTE
Just because the field is a blue field does not indicate the capability
to perform an approach into that field. Remember, 3000 feet is the
minimum emergency field length required.
ENROUTE WEATHER INFORMATION
Once airborne and established on your route, it is prudent to get a weather update, not only for
your intended landing field, but also for weather between your present position and destination.
This information is most easily obtained from a pilot-to-metro facility (PMSV), radio call sign
"METRO." A discussion of this service is contained in the FIH. FSS, radio call sign "(FSS
Name) RADIO", can also be useful sources of current weather. These can be identified on the
IFR charts by the heavy shadow over the air/ground communication boxes. FSS may provide
weather advisories but are not certified weather forecasters. Some selected NAVAIDs have
Transcribed Weather Enroute Broadcast (TWEB) and Hazardous In-flight Weather Advisory
Service (HIWAS) transmitted on the VOR. Refer to the IFR enroute chart legend.
Radio class code "B" VOR stations have scheduled weather broadcasts 15 minutes past every
hour. "AB" radio class VOR stations provide continuous weather broadcasts. The radio class
codes are listed under the individual NAVAIDs in the IFR Supplement.
LOST COMMUNICATIONS
Refer to Procedures for Two-way Radio Failure in the Emergency Procedures Section of the
FIH. It is virtually impossible to provide regulations and procedures applicable to all possible
situations associated with two-way radio communications failure. During two-way radio
communications failure, aircrews are expected to exercise good judgment in whatever action
they elect to take. Verify you have lost communications, Squawk 7600, and comply with the
FIH. In an attempt to cover the majority of situations that will be encountered, the FAA has
published specific procedures (FAR 91.185) that must be complied with and with which all
aircrew shall be familiar. These procedures are available to the aircrew during flight in the
Emergency Procedures Section of the FIH. In all circumstances, the aircrew should monitor all
available communications frequencies.
UNINTENTIONAL THUNDERSTORM PENETRATION
The first and most important rule about thunderstorms is to AVOID THEM and to avoid any area
where they may be found. Should unintentional thunderstorm penetration occur, follow the
NATOPS "Thunderstorms and Turbulence Procedures".
ICING
Refer to the NATOPS "In-flight Icing" procedure. SOP prohibits filing into areas where icing
conditions are forecast. Since instrument flight may involve prolonged operation through areas
SUPPLEMENTAL AND EMERGENCY PROCEDURES D-3


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