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T-6A INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
CHAPTER FOUR
409. CLIMBS AND DESCENTS
The following sections will describe the various types of climbs and descents, which will be
utilized when transiting from the terminal to the enroute structure and vice versa.
NOTES
1.  ATC requires a climb or descent rate consistent with the operating
characteristics of the aircraft to 1000 feet above or below the assigned
altitude and then attempt a climb or descent rate between 500 feet per
minute to 1500 feet per minute to the assigned altitude.
2.  A voice report to ATC upon reaching altitude is not given
unless specifically requested.
Occasionally, ATC will find it necessary to assign a higher altitude to comply with IFR
separation requirements. Aircrew may also request a different altitude to take advantage of more
favorable winds or other in-flight conditions.
Report 500 feet prior to assigned level off altitude to your IP.
Report leveling off at assigned altitude to your IP and to ATC (if required).
A cruise descent is a procedure used to descend to a lower altitude while enroute to destination.
A cruise descent is normally accomplished by reducing power to maintain cruise true airspeed
while reducing altitude at a rate as desired by the pilot (typically 2000 3000 feet per minute).
An enroute descent is a procedure used when descending into the terminal area not performing a
high-altitude penetration approach. Typically, this will be a 200 KIAS descent at approximately
10% torque, until within 1000 feet above level off.
410. INTERSECTIONS
An intersection is a point along an airway where two or more radials from two or more stations
cross. Using TACAN/VOR/DME, an intersection may be identified as a radial and distance
from a station. The station you are using to navigate on the airway is called the primary station.
If a station off the airway is used to identify the intersection, it is called the secondary station.
Intersections are used to determine the aircraft's position along the airway.
Procedures for identifying and turning at intersections will be introduced enroute.
TURNING AT AN INTERSECTION PROCEDURES
1.
Determine your ETA to the intersection.
INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
4-17


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