Quantcast High Altitude Approach - P-8710144

 

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CHAPTER FIVE
T-6A INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
NOTE
At locations where ATC radar service is provided, the pilot should
conform to radar vectors when provided by ATC in lieu of the
published missed approach procedure.
When the approach has been missed, request clearance for a specific action (i.e., to alternate
airport, another approach, etc.)
513. HIGH ALTITUDE APPROACH
Amplification. IAP charts are divided into two categories: high altitude and low altitude. A
high altitude instrument approach enables an aircraft to transition from the high altitude structure
to a position on, and aligned with, the inbound course to the FAF, level on the FAF altitude in
the BAC.
High altitude instrument approaches are routinely executed by high performance military aircraft
into military aerodromes for the following reasons.
1.
To maintain efficient fuel consumption.
2.
To maintain higher TAS.
3.
To avoid low altitude weather until closer to the destination.
The procedures used to execute a high altitude instrument approach combine a penetration
pattern with IAPs. For this reason, high altitude approaches normally require higher rates of
descent and indicated airspeeds than low altitude approaches until the transition to BAC. High
altitude approaches are designed with an optimal 800 feet/NM descent gradient during the initial
approach segment (maximum allowable is 1000 feet/NM). Once the aircraft is in the BAC,
procedures for both high and low altitude instrument approaches are the same.
NOTE
Some high altitude approach charts have penetration instructions
printed in the profile view of the approach chart. Review and
comply with all printed instructions.
TRANSITION TO FINAL FROM INSTRUMENT CONDITIONS TO A VISUAL
LANDING.
The transition to final on an instrument approach may begin at any point (or past the VDP)
during the approach, once the field is in sight. On PAR, ASR, GPS, or ILS approaches, the
aircraft should be very close to being lined up on centerline. On a PAR or ILS, all that is
normally required is a speed reduction while continuing the descent from the DH to maintain a
5-64 TERMINAL PROCEDURES


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