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APPENDIX C
60-TO-1 RULE
The 60-to-1 Rule is a technique to establish predictable pitch changes and lead points for
intercepting courses or arcs.
The information and techniques within this appendix should not be viewed as required
procedures but as information to use in your execution of assigned maneuvers.
RADIAL SPACING
You are no doubt familiar with the concept that as your distance from a NAVAID increases, the
spacing between given radials also increase. But just how much does radial spacing increase as
you move from the station? To answer this question, consider the following. At a distance of 60
NM from the station, there is 1 mile between each radial. As you get closer to the station, the
radials are closer together. (For example at 30 NM from the station, there is 1/2 mile between
radials or 2 radials per mile; at 10 NM, it is 1/6 mile between radials, which equals 6 radials per
mile (Figure C-1.) In general, 60 divided by distance from the station equals the number of
radials per mile.
Figure C-1 Radial Spacing
DISTANCE FROM AIRWAY CENTERLINE
Recall a VOR Federal Airway is 8 NM wide, 4 NM on either side of the centerline below 18,000
feet MSL. On some occasions, it may be helpful to estimate your distance from airway
centerline. Again, merely convert angular distance to NM by the same calculation used above
(e.g., two radials south of course at 30 NM from the VOR/DME or VORTAC station equates to
1 NM south of airway centerline.)
60-TO-1 RULE
C-1


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