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CHAPTER ONE
T-6A INSTRUMENT NAVIGATION
As you probably realize, INAV will be a demanding stage of training requiring dedicated study.
A thorough working knowledge of procedures is essential to your success on instructional
flights. However, you must go beyond rote memorization of procedures and strive for a clear
understanding of each maneuver before you get into the plane. Remember, the knowledge
gained in this stage of training will be used as the foundation of INAV as you progress through
training and into your operational squadrons.
As important as instrument procedures and concepts are, you must be aware of your priorities
while in flight. Always remember the golden rule: "AVIATE, NAVIGATE,
COMMUNICATE, CHECKLISTS." These functions must be addressed in that order of
priority. In other words, monitoring desired flight parameters (heading, altitude, airspeed, etc.)
and monitoring aircraft systems performance should be your first priority. Do not become
preoccupied with navigation at the expense of safety. It would be pointless to have a precise plot
of your position if you inadvertently allowed the pilot to stall the aircraft while making this plot.
Navigating your aircraft properly has a higher priority than communicating. Consider the
following: During most flights, there are situations when just navigating properly takes all of
your concentration. Attempting to engage in radio communications could overload you to the
point of making errors in navigation. This is not to say that necessary radio transmissions should
be omitted or delayed excessively. However, a slight delay in reporting to ATC is more
preferable than ending up in a bad situation because you overloaded yourself with
communication tasks. Your last priority should be briefs and checklists between the pilot and
yourself.
101. AIR NAVIGATION AIDS
Various types of air navigation aids are in use today, each serving a special purpose. These aids
have varied owners and operators: The FAA, the military services, private organizations,
individual states, and foreign governments. The FAA has the statutory authority to establish,
operate, and maintain air navigation facilities. Additionally, the FAA prescribes standards for
the operation of any of these aids used for instrument flight in federally controlled airspace.
Aircrews should be aware of the possibility of momentary erroneous indications on cockpit
displays when the primary signal generator for a ground-based navigational transmitter (e.g., a
glideslope, VOR, or non-directional beacon is inoperative.) Aircrews should disregard any
navigation indication, regardless of its apparent validity, if the particular transmitter was
identified by NOTAM or otherwise as being unusable or inoperative.
VHF OMNIDIRECTIONAL RANGE
VORs operate within the 108.0 to 117.95 MHz frequency band and has a power output necessary
to provide coverage within its assigned operational service volume. They are subject to line-of-
sight restrictions and the range varies proportionally to the altitude of the receiving equipment.
1-2 INTRODUCTION TO NAVIGATION SYSTEMS


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