Quantcast Section Takeoff - P-8700025

 

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T-6A FORMATION
CHAPTER THREE
WARNING
Wake turbulence or Lead aircraft propeller wash may result in severe
degradation of trailing aircraft controllability during takeoff.
As the Wingman reaches 500 feet from the Lead, he should offset laterally approximately 200
feet from Lead with enough separation to allow his aircraft to be visible from the lead aircraft
when the 60 rendezvous bearing is acquired. The Wingman will then fly the 60 bearing line
and join in a parade position on the Lead or on the outside of the turn if the section is turning.
3.  Underrun. In the event the Wingman fails to recognize a rapid closure rate and is unable to
stop in the parade position, the appropriate underrun procedures (discussed in Chapter Four) will
be executed depending on whether or not the Lead is in a turn. In either case, keep the Lead in
sight and maintain stepdown. When relative motion is under control, reattempt a rendezvous.
302. SECTION TAKEOFF
1.  Lead/Wingman Procedures. The section takeoff has many practical advantages in tactical
aviation. It is frequently employed by sections of aircraft in order to expedite departures. It also
alleviates the necessity for a rendezvous, which is especially advantageous in poor weather
conditions. This is the preferred method of takeoff during this phase of training.
When cleared on to the runway, the flight will position on the runway as previously discussed in
Section 301. After receiving takeoff clearance and a thumbs-up from the Wingman, the Lead
will give the runup signal and set 30% torque. When the runup checks are complete and a
thumbs-up is received from the Wingmen, the Lead pilot will raise his arm vertically. The Lead
pilot will then drop his arm smoothly, and release the brakes when his arm stops moving
(normally when the pilot's hand hits the glare shield) and set 90% torque. On this signal, the
Wingman will release his brakes and maintain the 45 bearing line with Power Control Lever
(PCL) adjustments and minimal differential braking, (brakes being used only until rudder
becomes effective). Students will maintain a normal takeoff instrument scan while monitoring
Wingman's position as well.
At approximately 70 KIAS, the Lead student will give a climb or "go fly" signal. As the flight
approaches 85 KIAS, the Lead pilot will rotate smoothly to the takeoff attitude. The Wingman
should attempt to match the Lead's attitude. As both aircraft reach flying speed, they will
become airborne at the same time, both having the same attitude, weight, and airspeed.
After becoming airborne, continue to maintain stacked level with Lead. When at a safe altitude,
the Lead pilot will survey the Wingman to ensure they are safely climbing away from the ground
as well and are in position to see the gear retraction signal. The Lead pilot will then give a head
nod to raise the landing gear and flaps. At the execution, both pilots raise the gear and flaps
simultaneously. The Wingman shall pass the "thumbs-up" signal to inform Lead that Wingman's
landing gear and flaps are up and locked and Lead's gear and flaps appear up and locked. Lead
SECTION DEPARTURES
3-3


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