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CHAPTER SIX
FORMATION EMERGENCIES
600. INTRODUCTION
Two general points can be made pertaining to formation emergencies. First, the aircraft with the
emergency informs the other aircraft (requests the lead if necessary) and handles the emergency
IAW NATOPS. Second, within the formation, each aircraft stands ready to lend assistance to
another in an emergency situation. This assistance may be in the form of checklist backup,
location of nearest airfields, communication coordination, exterior aircraft inspection, and/or a
stable platform for Wingman to reference. The type of assistance obviously varies with the type
of emergency however, quick and accurate communications (Hydraulic, Engine, Fuel, Oxygen,
Electrical (HEFOE) if necessary) will greatly aid in coordination of a safe recovery.
NOTE
Avoid the potential tendency to assist to the point of jumping in the
emergency aircraft's cockpit. A good technique, even if you are
Lead, is to be prepared to offer any assistance when REQUESTED.
The emergencies listed in the T-6A NATOPS Manual and NATOPS Pocket Checklist are to be
used as in previous training. However, there are a few unique considerations pertaining to
formation flying which will be covered in the following paragraphs.
601. ABORTS
Serious thought must be given to the possible alternatives an aircrew has in the event an abort
situation should arise. There are two prime considerations in such cases; first, the safe abort of
the aircraft experiencing difficulty and secondly, the safety of the remaining aircraft in the flight.
For this reason, the runway centerline is treated as a brick wall not to be crossed while another
aircraft is in the vicinity. Better to go off the runway than hit a playmate.
It is impossible to list all of the possible situations that might arise. What follows are the
procedural guidelines for the general situation of an abort. These guidelines are just that and
should be tempered with sound judgment and decisive action on the part of the aircrew of the
aircraft involved.
In general, for the T-6A aircraft, the following principles should be applied along with NATOPS
procedures:
1.  Single Aircraft Abort. No sympathetic aborts. If one aircraft aborts, the other aircraft
should continue the takeoff unless the abort comes prior to brake release. In all cases there is no
substitute for good judgment. A short voice report should be made as soon as possible (i.e.,
"(Tactical Call sign), Lead is aborting").
FORMATION EMERGENCIES
6-1


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