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CHAPTER ONE
T-6A CONTACT
Therefore, SAFETY is one of our primary concerns during all phases of training. The goal of
contact flights for the SNFO/SWSO is to recognize an unsafe condition, make timely calls for
correction to avoid a mishap, and appreciate pilot workload and what you can do to reduce that
workload. There is no acceptable loss or toleration for anything less than total professionalism.
This is an achievable goal. Your instructors will set the example for you to follow.
102.
THE FLIGHT INSTRUCTOR
The flight instructor is an experienced aviator, trained to provide the student with a sound
foundation in the operation of the aircraft. Instructors undergo a training course similar to the
student's, which familiarizes them with curriculum maneuvers and teaches an effective means of
presentation. This training comes under the heading of standardization. The intent of
standardization is to provide the instructor with a logical, effective, and consistent foundation on
which to present any maneuver. This in turn, ensures all students can be judged on the same
basis, each having been exposed to the same material and afforded an equal opportunity to
demonstrate abilities. No two instructors will be identical in their techniques and each may vary
their presentation to fit the needs of the individual student; however, the goal is to provide
standardized training to the greatest extent possible.
In order to teach you to fly the T-6A properly, the instructor must critique your performance.
The instructor's feedback and suggestions are intended to improve your understanding and
technique. All criticism by the instructor should be constructive in character, with the intent to
develop a newly qualified NFO/WSO, ready for service.
Your flight instructor is a vital part of your training. Nonetheless, you must do your part as well.
The one word you will hear most from your instructor is PROCEDURES. In order for your time
in the aircraft to be devoted to the improvement of maneuver performance, it is imperative you
learn, memorize, and understand the procedural steps required to perform each of the various
maneuvers. Then, and only then, can your instructor's time with you be profitably utilized. The
instructor is well trained and qualified to teach, but success requires the fullest cooperation of the
student. If you have questions about procedures or concepts, ask. Again, knowing procedures,
for both normal and emergency operations, cannot be over-emphasized. They must be so
ingrained that they can be recalled in flight, especially during periods of high cockpit workload
and stress.
103.
AIRCREW COORDINATION
As safe, professional aircrews, it is our responsibility to continually challenge ourselves, question
unclear things, be willing to listen to new ideas and points of view, then evaluate and act. An
individual can grow professionally only through this challenge/evaluation cycle.
The following is a list of situations you must be aware of:
I'M SAFE CHECKLIST: our situational awareness resources vary from day to day.
Unfortunately, we don't have an external readout telling us or others when they are diminished.
1-2
CONTACT TRAINING


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