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CHAPTER SEVEN
T-6A CONTACT
of a Forced Landing, successful airstart, ejection, etc. Stay focused during the emergency, follow
the appropriate procedures, and carry the simulated emergency to a logical conclusion.
NOTE
When conducting simulated emergencies in flight, verbalize
emergency procedures that actually move switches or the PCL with
"simulated." For example, use "PMU Switch - OFF (simulated)."
During your airborne EP training, DO NOT actually manipulate
switches or position the PCL to OFF in flight. In response to "PCL -
OFF (simulated)," the instructor will set the power to 4 to 6 percent
to simulate the feathered propeller condition, when appropriate.
After receiving a simulated power loss, manage the simulated emergency in accordance with the
three basic rules governing all airborne emergencies (Section 701). Verbalize all boldfaced
items, take out your Pocket Checklist, and coordinate and direct the remaining steps of the
procedure. You will make all external radio calls on the UHF/VHF and any distress calls over
the ICS to the instructor.
An alert crewmember is constantly on the lookout for suitable landing fields in the event of an
actual emergency. If available, a 5000 feet or longer, hard-surfaced runway with no obstructions
(trees, power lines, etc.) on the approach end is ideal. Other suitable runway options are out
there; good headwork in field selection will make the difference between success and failure.
Always be aware of wind direction and velocity. If conducting a forced landing to an
uncontrolled airfield, you may not have a valid wind report. Use any means available to come up
with the winds. Visually, the best wind indicator is blowing smoke. If unable to determine the
winds, use your last known wind.
703.
PRECAUTIONARY EMERGENCY LANDING
Given a simulated impending engine failure, utilize the NATOPS PEL procedure to recover the
aircraft to a suitable landing field. The instructor will initiate the PEL by informing you of a
simulated engine malfunction, such as a Chip Detector Warning, which will eventually lead you
to the PEL procedure. The underlying function of the PEL is to establish the aircraft in a position
such that, if the engine quits, you will have sufficient energy (altitude and airspeed) to perform a
propeller-feathered glide to a suitable runway.
Refer to the NATOPS, Section III, Precautionary Emergency Landing procedure. Read and
understand the procedure and all the associated notes, warnings, and cautions.
Unlike the total power loss scenarios, power is available in a PEL and should be used, if
necessary, to reach dead-engine glide distance to high key. Utilize maximum allowable power to
initiate a climb pertinent to the given emergency procedure. For example, use 60% torque for
oil-related malfunctions; however, utilize 100%, if no power restriction is specified in NATOPS.
After base key, use power as required to regain profile. Climb at 140 KIAS prior to high key;
thereafter, utilize ELP profile speeds for correction climbs back to profile.
7-6
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES


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