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T-6A CONTACT
CHAPTER THREE
Figure 3-6 Climbing and Descending Flight
310.
THE INTERDEPENDENCE OF CONTROLS/POWER
The overlapping functions of the controls provide a safety factor in the control of the aircraft. It
is quite possible to fly the aircraft without the use of one or more controls. For example, suppose
the elevators failed to operate properly. It is possible to control the position of the nose by the
use of power. As the power is increased, the nose will rise; as the power is decreased, the nose
will drop.
It is also possible to bank the aircraft and turn it without the use of ailerons. Using only the
rudder, the plane can be turned in any desired direction. This use of the rudder will cause the
aircraft to yaw, or skid, in the direction the rudder is applied. During the yawing motion, the
outside wing moves faster through the air than the inside wing. This increases the lift of the
outside wing, causing it to rise, thus producing a bank in the direction the rudder is applied. A
turn can also be accomplished by using only ailerons. In this instance, the aircraft will have a
tendency to slip before it begins to turn due to adverse yaw.
The foregoing discussion was given to show the advantage of the overlapping functions of the
controls. It must be emphasized, however, smooth and balanced flight can only be achieved
through the proper coordination of all controls. Make it easy--trim the aircraft.
FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS
3-9


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