Quantcast Figure 3-4 Sixty Degree AOB Turn

 

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T-6A CONTACT
CHAPTER THREE
304.
COORDINATED FLIGHT
Coordinated, or balanced, flight exists when the aircraft is neither in a slip nor a skid (discussed
later in the chapter) as it progresses along a flight path; in other words, the aircraft's nose is
properly aligned with the relative wind. For an aircraft to be in coordinated flight, the controls
(most notably the rudder and/or rudder trim) have been used to align the aircraft's longitudinal
axis with the forward plane of motion.
The utilization of either the rudder or the ailerons, independent of one another, will result in a
condition of unbalanced flight. The turn and bank indicator on the bottom of the EHSI has a
free-rolling "balance" ball which indicates an uncoordinated condition by moving away from the
center position in the direction of the slip or skid. The pilot can also recognize this condition by
a sensation of side motion. This unbalanced condition can be corrected by the proper application
of the rudder (i.e. step on the ball), ailerons, or both. Efficient use of the rudder trim, in
conjunction with the TAD, will aid in flying smoothly, in coordinated flight.
During a turn, maintain coordinated flight by moving the aircraft into and through the turn at a
rate which is in direct proportion to the degree of bank. The coordinated application of ailerons
and rudders establish the AOB. The amount of rudder required to establish a turn is dependent
upon the rate at which the AOB is established. In other words, rolling into a turn rapidly requires
more rudder than rolling into the same turn slowly. Remember, if the balance ball is centered,
you're in coordinated flight.
305.
TURNS
The turn is the most complex of basic flight maneuvers. Figure 3-4 demonstrates a 60 AOB
turn. During the execution of a turn, coordinated use of all three flight controls is required.
Figure 3-4 Sixty Degree AOB Turn
FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS
3-5


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