Quantcast Chapter One Contact Training - P-8680013

 

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CHAPTER ONE
CONTACT TRAINING
100.
INTRODUCTION
This Flight Training Instruction (FTI) contains procedures and information needed to complete
the contact stage of training. This instruction is comprehensive; however, it is imperative you
reference the T-6A Naval Air Training And Operating Procedures Standards (NATOPS) manual
when preparing for every flight (most notably for the study of emergency procedures). Before
you begin your preparation you should understand the general goals of the contact stage. Student
Naval Flight Officers (SNFO)/Student Weapon System Operators (SWSO) receive "stick time"
in a pilot-like syllabus in order to create and build the following skills:
1. Visual Flight Rules (VFR) situational awareness: the ability to recognize any aircraft
situation relative to the four dimensions of time, airspeed, heading, and position over the earth.
2. VFR scan: the ability to recognize deviations from the base airspeed, altitude and heading
with reference to flight instruments and the horizon.
3. Flight procedures and their execution: throughout your career, you will be responsible for
flight procedures (NATOPS or mission-oriented). The T-6A contact stage will provide your
initial training to help build the skill of recalling specific procedures while operating in more
stressful environments.
You will accomplish a series of maneuvers from this manual including taxi, takeoffs, transitions,
stalls, spins, landing pattern work, and finally, precision aerobatics. These maneuvers will be
graded with reference to the above goals and the course training standards. If you are well
prepared for each flight, knowing the procedures and discussion items, you will enjoy your initial
military flight experience and get the most of out it.
101.
BACKGROUND
Naval Aviation training has come a long way since 1910 when Lieutenant T. G. Ellyson was
ordered to flight instruction to become the first Naval Aviator. Soon thereafter the U.S. Navy
purchased its first aircraft, the Curtis Triad, at a cost of $5,500. Since then, naval aviation
technology has progressed at a rapid rate. The fleet aircraft of today's Navy are tremendously
complex and demanding machines capable of astonishing performance. Advancements in
aviation technology are only part of a much bigger picture. Even the most modern aircraft will
most certainly fail to accomplish its mission if its crew is poorly trained or incompetent.
Therefore, a thorough and comprehensive training program is essential to mission
accomplishment.
Early aviation pioneers suffered through many accidents, which became unwanted yet
commonplace occurrences. A good landing was one from which you could walk away! Today,
the safety record of Naval Aviation is the best it has ever been. Accidents or mishaps are rare yet
do occur. Our universal goal is a zero mishap rate, especially in the training environment.
CONTACT TRAINING 1-1


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