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CHAPTER EIGHT
AEROBATICS
800.
INTRODUCTION
Aerobatics is any intentional maneuver involving an abrupt change in aircraft's attitude,
intentionally performed spins, or other maneuvers requiring pitch/dive angles greater than 45,
bank angles greater than 60, or accelerations greater than two Gs.
The instructor will fly aerobatics as demo items on your contact checkride. SNFO/SWSOs are
responsible to know the maneuver geometric shapes as well as their defining parameters (Figure
8-1). You will also be receiving training on the Anti-G straining maneuver and the physiological
effects of increased G loads. Review the aircraft G limits.
All aerobatic maneuvers will be commenced from aerobatic cruise which is defined as straight
and level, balanced flight utilizing airspeeds between 220 250 KIAS. Transition to aerobatic
cruise by increasing power to maximum and trimming for straight and level flight.
Prior to performing aerobatic maneuvers, complete the Pre-Stalling, Spinning, and Aerobatic
Checks per the T-6A In-flight guide and accomplish the clearing turns. For the clearing turns,
use a minimum of 45 AOB and turn for a minimum of 180. Throughout the turn thoroughly
check the area for the proximity of other aircraft.
Start your aerobatic maneuvers from an altitude which will permit a complete maneuver and a
return to straight and level flight at or above 6000 feet. You must not exceed the maximum
altitude permitted for your operating area. The maneuvers performed require approximately
2500 feet vertically.
801.
G-INDUCED LOSS OF CONSCIOUSNESS
G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) is a fainting episode caused by gravity-induced
physiological changes on the human body. The most common G-force is the +G, which is the
gravitational force sustained by the pilot, NFO or WSO during pullout from a dive or a high
AOB turn. The G force is from head to foot and gives the feeling of being squashed down in the
seat. The danger of +Gs is that blood pools are forced into lower extremities (legs) and lower
abdomen. This pooling dramatically reduces the available blood to the brain and eyes, thereby
reducing the oxygen required to maintain consciousness and vision.
Poor blood return to the heart and possible hyperventilation (rapid breathing) by the excited pilot,
leads to gray out, where peripheral vision is impaired, blackout, where vision is lost completely,
and then loss of consciousness, which usually occurs simultaneously with blackout.
G-LOC lasts from 15-30 seconds. When the aviator wakes, it is to a disoriented or "dream-like"
level of consciousness, which can last from only a few seconds to several minutes. Amnesia and
AEROBATICS
8-1


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