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T-6A CONTACT
CHAPTER THREE
312.
ASSUMING CONTROL OF THE AIRCRAFT
A most important flying safety requirement is a clear, positive understanding at all times of who
has control of the aircraft. You must understand the procedures involved in transferring control
of an aircraft.
The instructor will tell you over the intercommunications system (ICS), "I have the controls."
When your instructor says, "I have the controls," you acknowledge by stating over the ICS, "You
have the controls." You then take your hands and feet off the controls. Your instructor will then
confirm control by saying, "I have the controls." Conversely, but in the same manner, when your
instructor wants you to fly, he/she will say, "You have the controls," whereupon you will take
control and acknowledge over the ICS, "I have the controls." The instructor will then complete
the exchange with another, "You have the controls." Keep flying the aircraft until you are told to
do otherwise. Understand that unless you and the instructor complete the 3-way exchange of
controls, no exchange of control was made. For example, your instructor may coach or aid your
flare during a landing. You may feel a presence on the control stick, but you are still flying and
should continue to do so. Never be in doubt as to who is flying; if you are not absolutely sure,
safety dictates you speak up and ask! If you have any questions about how to exchange control
of the aircraft, any instructor can help you.
313.
Proper radio communication techniques are extremely important to safety when operating in
controlled airspace or the vicinity of other aircraft. You should read and learn the contact radio
communications in the Voice Communications Student Guide prior to your first flight.
FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS
3-11


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