Quantcast Preflight - P-8670017

 

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STUDENT GUIDE
T-39 FLIGHT PREPARATION
The T-39 is checklist-intensive, so it is very important the student becomes extremely
familiar with the cockpit layout to ensure quick and timely checklist completion. Cockpit
familiarity comes only by looking at a cockpit layout and performing the checklists until you are
comfortable with the location of switches and the proper checklists responses.
This Section covers only checklist items that are not self-evident. Thorough discussions of
cockpit procedures and event flow are presented in paragraph 2.16, Assignment Sheet and
Appendix A. Expanded information on Normal and Emergency T-39 procedures are found in
the NATOPS.
Study all Notes, Warnings, and Cautions associated with checklists
8.
PREFLIGHT
Preflighting any aircraft begins with reading the Aircraft Discrepancy Book (ADB) (the pilot
will do this at the squadron) and continues as you approach the plane. Before walking to the
aircraft, preflight yourself by closing all zippers on your flight suit and inventory your carry-on
items. Scan the area in and around the aircraft as you may notice things from afar that you
would not notice up close. Once you reach the aircraft, you should not have to use your PCL for
this procedure. You will learn to preflight the T-39 by way of a FAM O brief with an instructor,
by watching a video in class, and by practicing on your own. Some general things to look for
while preflighting any aircraft are fluid leaks, safety wires, cotter keys, missing nuts or rivets,
electrical wire connections or frayed wires, fluid levels, pitot system condition, and switchology
to name only a few. As you get to know your aircraft better, preflights will become easier.
9.
PRE-POWER CHECKS
This checklist is not challenge and response. It is completed on your own. Take your time
and be thorough. It is designed as a cockpit "wipe-out" and your checks should get quicker with
practice. Try not to be intimidated by the pilot finishing his first. Remember, the pilot has done
this many more times than you. Tell the pilot when you are complete, and ask if he is ready to
start engines. More than likely, the pilot will be ready.
When checking the circuit breakers, you check the panel above the pilot, and the pilot will
check the one above you. It is easier to see the white ring of a popped CB when viewed from an
angle rather than straight on. It is easier to check your oxygen mask before actually taking your
seat.
10.
STARTING ENGINES (C&R)
If the pilot is ready to start engines, ensure you have a fire bottle and a plane captain, then
begin this checklist. The "essential bus circuit breaker out" caution light and Master Caution
lights are tested by pressing the ESS BUS CB out test button on the same panel. To test the
battery temperature circuitry press the Battery Temp test button on the electrical control panel.
This activates the BATT HOT caution light as well as the Master Caution Lights. The fire-
warning test activates the firelights, a loud bell, the Master Caution lights, and the AFT Fuselage
Hot light. During the start, the student scans from outside-in checking engine instruments and
1-3


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