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INTERMEDIATE FLIGHT PREPARATION WORKBOOK
APPENDIX H
approach. The corrections below summarize landing data corrections required due to wind
effects.
Wind Corrections
In planning the landing, accounting for wind requires the wind direction and speed be known.
The headwind (or tailwind) and crosswind components can then be determined using Takeoff
and Landing Crosswind Chart in the PCL. Application of wind components to landing data is
discussed below.
Headwind
If advantage of a headwind is to be taken, use 50% of the steady headwind component when
determining flare and ground roll distances.
Tailwind
Apply 150% of the tailwind component to flare and ground roll distances.
Crosswind
When determining the crosswind component, enter the Wind Component Chart with the sum of
the steady wind value plus the gust increment. The maximum demonstrated crosswind for
takeoff and landing is 25 knots. Takeoff and landings in crosswinds greater than 25 knots are not
recommended.
Gusts
The gust increment is obtained from ground meteorological sources, usually the Control Tower.
It is the difference between the reported steady wind velocity and the reported peak gust velocity.
Increase the landing threshold speed and touchdown speed by 50% of the gust increment, not to
exceed a speed increase of 10 knots.
Go-Around Planning
The decision to go around should be made as early as possible, since jet engine acceleration time
is high and approach speeds are relatively close to touchdown speeds. This is of extreme
importance when one engine is inoperative, since the reduced thrust available and the limited
directional control under such circumstances may make a go-around impossible. A maximum
safe go-around %N1 setting can be read from the in-flight guide. Regardless of the aircraft
configuration (e.g., 1 or 2 engines operating), if the applicable go-around %N1 setting is not
exceeded and the aircraft is not slowed below the appropriate speed, VMCA will always be less
than or equal to the speed at which go-around is initiated. For a go-around, observe flap
retraction speeds. When the maximum landing weight is observed, a minimum 1-engine
inoperative climb gradient of 2.5% will be obtainable at VAC with the landing gear retracted. The
T-1A PERFORMANCE MANUAL EXTRACTS
H-9


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