Quantcast Critical Engine Failure Speed

 

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APPENDIX A
INTERMEDIATE FLIGHT PREPARATION WORKBOOK
Critical Engine Failure Speed
Critical Engine Failure Speed (VCEF) is defined as the speed at which one engine can fail and the
same distance is required to either continue to accelerate to lift-off speed, or to abort and
decelerate to a full stop.
Critical Field Length
The Critical Field Length (CFL) is the total length of runway required to accelerate on all engines
to VCEF, experience an engine failure, then continue to liftoff or stop. It is used during takeoff
planning, together with the climbout data, to determine maximum gross weight for a safe takeoff
and climbout. For a safe takeoff the critical field length must be no greater than the runway
available.
Takeoff Factor
Takeoff Factors (TOF) are used to simplify the use of charts. These TOF numbers are %N1
settings adjusted for Outside Air Temperature (OAT) and altitude and are presented on a
different scale. The TOFs are used to enter various charts which require a thrust correction.
Takeoff Ground Run
Takeoff ground run distance is defined as that runway distance normally obtained in service
operation at zero wind at the mission-specified weight, pressure altitude, thrust setting, ambient
temperature, and appropriate takeoff configuration, using lift-off speed. The runway shall have
no slope.
Minimum Control Speed Ground
Minimum Control Speed Ground (VMCG) is the speed (88 KIAS) during the takeoff run, at which,
when an engine is failed, it is possible to maintain directional control using only primary
aerodynamic controls without deviating more than 25 feet laterally. This speed is established
with the remaining engine at the takeoff thrust setting, with the aircraft loaded at the most
unfavorable weight and center of gravity, with the aircraft trimmed for takeoff, and without
exceeding 180 pounds of rudder control force. Conditions of crosswind and RCR may increase
VMCG.
Minimum Control Speed Air
Minimum Control Speed Air (VMCA) is the minimum in-flight speed (89 KIAS) at which an
engine loss can be experienced and directional control maintained using full rudder deflection, 5
AOB into the operating engine, and not more than 180 lbs of rudder control force. VMCA is
always less than takeoff speed and is not considered in takeoff planning.
A-4 GLOSSARY


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