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INTERCEPT PROCEDURES TEXTBOOK
IP-19: FLEET CONVERSION PROCEDURES
PART I
Introduction
The conversion is a long-range (30 nm) set-up where the bogey is taken off collision in order
to manipulate the given TA. Previously, the main goal of the intercept was to place the bogey on
collision to decrease the range between the fighter and bogey in the fastest way possible. The
initial target aspect was preserved with the knowledge that lateral separation, which equates to
turning room in the CT, was different for each different TA. By conducting a conversion
intercept, the fighter can optimize TA or lateral separation for a particular situation.
There will be times and circumstances where certain specific target aspects or lateral
displacements are appropriate. Consider a few:
(1)
Sun position, terrain, and other environmental considerations
(2)
Lack of one or the other type of missile
(3)
Section tactics and restrictions
(4)
Enemy tactics and formations
(5)
Position of home-base, a defended force, or the defended point
(6)
Requirement to visually identify the bogey
The goal of this text is to introduce tactical conversion fundamentals so that the weapons
officer can come up with a viable game plan for application in VT-86. A successful conversion
intercept includes achieving (as close as possible) the lateral separation and/or TA geometry
dictated by the tactical situation, while properly employing the Sparrow and Sidewinder missiles.
In order to maneuver around the bogey's flight path, the fighter will be faced with what might
initially be an uncomfortable situation: a drifting bogey. The fighter will have to keep track of
drift and the changing target aspect to perform the conversion intercept successfully.
One more concern of real-world intercepts will be addressed in this unit: jinking bogies.
Most bogies won't maintain a steady heading throughout the intercept. The procedures to
recognize and counter jinking bogies will be introduced following the discussion of the
conversion intercept.
Advanced Modes
Students should be familiar with the advanced modes of the APG-66NT, in particular the
Down Look Search (DLS) mode. The Down Look Search mode will be the primary mode for all
conversion intercepts, but the data block will be available for students' use only on a limited
basis. The advantage of DLS with the data block is that all target parameters are displayed,
including bogey's aspect, speed, heading, and altitude. A bogey can, therefore, be put on
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