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INTERCEPT PROCEDURES TEXTBOOK
IP-18: UNKNOWN PROCEDURES
Introduction
The fighter will not always have the luxury of being told the bogey's heading at the start of
every intercept. Although modern fighters with a tactical display usually have a selectable
heading read-out for each bogey, effective electronic countermeasures may prevent the system
from determining reliable heading information. Therefore, it is imperative to use procedures for
intercepts that have unknown variables.
Threat Picture with Bullseye Control
Bullseye control allows multiple friendly forces, in different locations, to be able to assess
bogey locations with respect to a universally known reference point, generically known as
Bullseye. Once the location of a Bullseye is established among friendly forces, controllers can
provide contact positions with bearing and range from Bullseye (Bull). In this way, anyone
listening to the common GCI frequency can gain SA concerning the location of bogey, bandit,
hostile, neutral or friendly forces.
Bullseye calls can come in two formats. The first, using cardinal and semi-cardinal headings,
gives a rough estimate of the bogey's position. The second, and more common, is digital
bullseye, which most modern aircraft are able to show on at least one cockpit display. The
following is an example digital bullseye call where Vulcan is the name of the bullseye:
"Gritrock, single group, Vulcan 155, 57, medium, capping."
As shown above, a number of pieces of information may be given during a picture call, to
include: GCI callsign (the one providing the info), the number of groups, the name of the
bullseye point (there may be more than one in a given area of operations), magnetic bearing from
the bullseye point, range from the bullseye point, contact altitude, and any other information
relevant to the group. The GCI information may also be more vague, such as in this example:
"Gritrock, picture, single group, Northeast Bull - 20, medium, heading south."
Before the fighters actually commit on the contacts, the information is called Broadcast
Bullseye--the calls are used to provide general SA to everyone in the immediate area. Once the
fighters commit, the calls are called Tactical Bullseye--they are aimed at providing specific
targeting information to the fighters who will be engaging the targets. Here at VT-86, we focus
on the Tactical Bullseye format.
No matter how general the GCI picture, it should provide enough accuracy for fighters to
point their sensors in the correct piece of sky to gain contact. True correlation comes when the
fighter gains acquisition and gives a contact call with a precise digital bull or BRA call. The
controller can then provide declaration information when they feel the contact has been
sufficiently correlated between fighter and controller. At VT-86, since our radars are not
equipped with digital Bullseye capabilities, fighter contact calls will always be in the BRA
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