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INTERCEPT PROCEDURES TEXTBOOK
IP 13: GCI INTERCEPT PROGRESSION
Initiating a GCI Intercept
Certain tactical situations may require the fighter to complete the intercept using only GCI
information. These include, but are not limited to:
(1)
Radar degradation or failure.
(2)
The need to suppress radar signals from the fighter that may set off the enemy's Radar
Homing and Warning (RHAW) equipment.
(3)
Electronic jamming emissions that degrade the fighter's radar picture.
When faced with these factors, the fighter has to rely on the only information available: that
of the GCI controller. This information is accurate at long range, but decays as slant range
decreases. Because a GCI radar scope does not update as fast as a fighter's, the information must
be interpolated by the controller at range and by the fighter in close. These limitations require
the fighter to visualize the intercept as if it were occurring on the scope, and anticipate when
procedures should be accomplished.
Placing the Bogey on Collision Course
An intercept will originate from a relationship in space between the fighter and the bogey
along a bearing line. The lack of a bogey on the scope does not change this relationship. The
fighter can establish a collision course if given the bogey heading and bearing from GCI.
The initial setup of an intercept is the same regardless of the status of the fighter's scope. The
fighter establishes collision with the following formula:
BR to BB to CH
Although the bogey is not acquired, collision is established as long as the bogey does not
drift. Once steadied, if the bogey does drift to a "0" or "5" based on a GCI call, the fighter
employs the same formula to reestablish collision.
To aid in visualization of the intercept, the BDHI is utilized. The procedure for doing this is
known simply as the "ABC" method.
(A) Set the CDI bar of the BDHI to the bogey's heading.
(B) Set the BDHI Heading Bug to the bogey bearing call.
(C) After collision course is established, the heading bug should be positioned half-way
between the tail of the CDI bar and the fighter's heading.
92


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