Quantcast Figure 4 - P-8250042

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Figure 4
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



INTERCEPT PROCEDURES TEXTBOOK
Predicting Angle Off
We know the bogey will always drift if it is not on collision bearing. Provided there is no
change in bogey or fighter heading, angle off can be predicted by utilizing the following formula:
As the range halves, the degrees the bogey is off
Collision bearing will double
In Figures 4 and 5, DTG is 160, R-L pass, with collision bearing at 10R. (Remember, since
CB is always 1/2 the cut, you must therefore have a 20R cut to be on collision). If the bogey
has an AO of 20R at 20 miles, how can you predict the future AO?
Use the above formula to work through this example:
a. With 160 R-L, 10R CB and 20R AO at 20 miles, the bogey is 10 off collision
bearing.
b. The bogey will be twice the distance off CB at 10 miles, or the bogey will be 20R of
CB. Since neither aircraft has changed heading, the cut and CB have remained constant
(20R cut & 10R CB). The bogey is now 20R of the 10R CB, putting the bogey at 30R
AO.
Figure 4
36


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.