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INTERCEPT PROCEDURES TEXTBOOK
little more like the aviator in the fleet acquiring a contact. For example, the student picking up a
contact on the scope will now say:
(for single contacts) "Maddog, single group, bullseye
180/55, declare"
or
"Maddog, single group, BRA, 260/32, hot, declare"
and
(for multiple groups) "Maddog, two groups, azimuth, 10, Northern group
Bullseye 180/55"
or
"Maddog, two groups, range 10, BRA to the near group, 260/32,
hot, declare"
If you do not understand the meaning of the calls above, go back and decipher them until
their meanings are clear and you can build the picture of what is being said by the fighter. When
you hit the real world/fleet, everyone else will be expecting to hear calls that build a picture with
the fewest number of words so as to maintain clarity and communications brevity.
Conclusion
The overall objective of advanced intercept training is for weapons officers to gain the ability
to effectively employ their basic tactical tools. At VT-86, these tools boil down to brains, the
voice, eyeballs, cockpit instruments, and the APG-66NT radar/weapons system. Because of the
limitations of the training aircraft (T-39), real world tactics are neither feasible nor intended to be
simulated with great accuracy. However, what can be accomplished is the development of the
skills required to properly see and interpret bogey maneuvers and react to them in a timely and
decisive manner. For this reason, certain actions, such as attempting to continue a counterturn
after a bogey jinks into the fighter at 10 nm, which do not make sense in a truly tactical
environment, are required here in order to force the student to use all of the indicators the radar
provides to properly decipher bogey maneuvers in an extremely dynamic and time-compressed
environment. For example, tactically, if a fighter feels targeted inside of 10 nm or so, it will
most likely bring the bogey to the nose and work for an offensive merge. In contrast, at VT-86,
we initially try to aggressively cool off the counterturn after an initial jink into in order to force
the student into a situation that requires accurate and timely interpretation of radar scope
indications. Also, the student is required to recognize follow-on bogey jinks (hot-nose or not)
and make a decision where, if sufficient turning room exists, the fighter will continue the CT;
otherwise, the fighter will bring the bogey to the nose and work for an offensive merge. This
artificial "tactic" creates a difficult scenario forcing quick and accurate interpretation of the radar
scope, which is the underlying training objective.
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