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BASIC INSTRUMENT PROCEDURES
CHAPTER ONE
very cumbersome to control with the keyboard (for example, in NFO Mode, twelve or more key
strokes may be required to effect a change of heading). For this reason, Simulator Instructors
will normally acknowledge all student requests for changes in heading, airspeed, altitude,
configuration, etc., in order that the student will realize that the instructor is working on the
request. The student should interpret this acknowledgment as a signal that further requests for
the same change are neither required nor desired and will only be interruptions. The 2F101 has a
number of unique performance characteristics, which, if understood, can make training easier:
1.
When the 2F101 enters the NFO Mode, both engines will start simultaneously.
2.
Upon completing engine starts, the trainer will be constructively "located" on the surface at
NAS Pensacola and the engines will be at idle.
3.
When ready for takeoff, the simulator will be programmed for takeoff by the instructor.
The engines will go to MRT and the simulator will commence a takeoff roll unless either the
parking brakes are held or the hook is down and the trainer arresting gear is "rigged". Normal
procedures will be to keep the arresting gear handle down until MRT checks are complete and
the student is ready for takeoff.
4.
The student will raise the arresting hook to begin the takeoff roll
5.
The trainer will takeoff, commence climbout, and retract the gear and flaps without console
keyboard activation. The gear and flaps will automatically retract regardless of gear and flap
handle position in the cockpit. After gear retraction, the student must raise the gear handle to
extinguish the light in the gear handle and to obtain a safe gear up-and-locked indication.
6.
The trainer will frequently accelerate to 270 or 280 knots during the early portions of a
climbout, and then decelerate to 170 - 180 knots during the climb. Climbout turns will be at 30
angle of bank. Students are reminded that lead points to intercept arcs and radials are based on
turn radii, which vary with angle of bank and groundspeed.
7.
Unless directed otherwise, in the clean configuration, the 2F101 will accelerate to 250
KIAS every time it levels off at a new altitude. This can cause unwary students to cruise or enter
holding at incorrect airspeeds.
8.
When decelerating to a slower indicated airspeed while in level flight, the 2F101 typically
has some difficulty in establishing the new requested airspeed. It will commonly overshoot the
requested airspeed, overcorrect with an excessive power change, overshoot again, overcorrect
again, etc. Nonetheless, the deviations steadily diminish, and the requested airspeed will
eventually be established. Groundspeed checks during this "bracketing" process are as accurate
as those accomplished with a steady indicated airspeed, because the new requested airspeed is
bracketed equally by the diminishing variations.
9.
When decelerating to a slower indicated airspeed while in level flight, it is common to see
the 2F101 altitude decrease momentarily by about 100 feet. A call of this altitude deviation
indicates a sharp student scan.
BASIC INSTRUMENT PROCEDURES 1-3


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