Quantcast Single Radio Limitations/Terminology

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Single Radio Limitations/Terminology
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



CHAPTER THREE
RADIO INSTRUMENTS
4.
Route of flight.
5.
Altitude data in the order flown.
6.
Mach number, if applicable.
7.
(Clearance procedures for airborne USAF aircraft).
8.
Holding instructions.
9.
Any special information.
10. Frequency and beacon code information.
SINGLE RADIO LIMITATIONS/TERMINOLOGY
Federal Aviation Regulations (91.183 in part) require crews maintain a continuous watch on
assigned ATC frequency:
"The pilot in command of each aircraft operated under IFR in controlled airspace shall have a
continuous watch maintained on the appropriate frequency and .... "
The operable term in the excerpt above is "continuous". Therefore, it is technically a flight
violation to "sneak over" to ATIS between frequency changes. To comply with the FARs, a
crew in the single radio T-2 must request permission to go off frequency to get ATIS or talk to
METRO. The standard UHF call will be: "Center, ROKT 205 request 2 minutes off frequency,
monitor guard".
Use appropriate radio terminology in the National Airspace System, and correct tactical
terminology outside national airspace. When operating tactically (from an aircraft carrier on the
high seas, or on military missions in Special Use Airspace), tactical radio communications terms
are required. Those terms are confusing and unprofessional when used in the National Airspace
System. For example, reporting "commencing" an approach and referring to altitudes as Angels
("one point five") are both correct when operating tactically, whereas in the National Airspace
System, there is no report required when "commencing" an approach, and altitudes are referred
to in thousands and hundreds of feet ("one thousand five hundred").
Refrain from using the term "Numbers" when referring to the ATIS. "Numbers" means wind,
altimeter, and runway information only.
Use callsign first or callsign last in communications with ATC. "Rocket 205, Roger" or
"descend and maintain one thousand five hundred, Rocket 205".
3-12
RADIO INSTRUMENTS


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
6230 Stone Rd, Unit Q Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 493-0744
Google +