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CHAPTER THREE
RADIO INSTRUMENTS
Instrument Departure Procedures
A published Departure Procedure (DP) will normally be filed when available. Should a DP not
be available, a radar departure may be requested in the remarks section of the flight plan. When
utilizing a radar departure, ATC will provide the departure aircraft with headings to place the
aircraft on course. The student should be familiar with local terrain in order to maintain
obstruction clearance should lost communications occur prior to joining the route of flight.
The Aeronautical Information Manual, paragraph ADHERENCE TO CLEARANCE states, in
part...
"The guiding principle is that the last ATC clearance has
precedence over the previous ATC clearance. When the route or
altitude in a previously issued clearance is amended, the controller
will restate applicable altitude restrictions. If altitude to maintain
is changed or restated, whether prior to departure or while
airborne, and previously issued altitude restrictions are omitted,
those altitude restrictions are canceled, including departure
procedure (and STAR) altitude restrictions."
NOTE
An aircraft does not have to be airborne for the change or
restatement of altitude to omit altitude restrictions. 2F101
instructors will occasionally provide VT-86 students an
opportunity to display knowledge of the above procedure during
RI simulator events.
Instrument Takeoff
The Instrument Takeoff (ITO) is performed without viewing visual references outside the
cockpit. It is performed during conditions of low ceilings and visibility to facilitate the abrupt
transition from takeoff roll on the surface to a climbout at low altitude in IMC conditions. As a
non-visual trainer, the 2F101 will simulate a "zero-zero" takeoff and climbout. During an ITO, a
close scan of flight instruments by the student is required for safety. After completion of MRT
checks, the instructor will approve raising the hook in the 2F101 and the simulator will
commence a takeoff roll, during which time the BDHI is the critical instrument. At 10 KIAS
below lift-off speed (about 100 KIAS), the scan should shift primarily to the VGI as the nose is
rotated 8 - 10 degrees up. As the aircraft lifts off at approximately 110 KIAS, the attitude gyro
will remain the central instrument for scanning pitch and bank. When the vertical speed
indicator and altimeter indicate that a positive climb has been established, the 2F101 will
automatically retract the landing gear. The gear handle must then be raised by the student to
extinguish the light in the gear handle. At 135 KIAS and 300 feet AGL the simulator will
automatically retract the flaps.
3-18
RADIO INSTRUMENTS


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