Quantcast Enroute Phase - P-8210071

 

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RADIO INSTRUMENTS
CHAPTER THREE
IFR Departure
The student will utilize the VT-86 In-Flight Guide to complete required crew communications
and checklists, and will provide requests for headings and altitudes as required to navigate
through the departure.
Altimeter Procedures
From the surface to 18,000 feet MSL, the current altimeter setting of a station along the route of
flight and within 100 miles shall be used. In the event of two-way radio failure, the forecast
altimeter setting obtained from the weather brief should be used.
At or above 18,000 feet MSL, an altimeter setting of 29.92 shall be used and all references to
altitudes shall be in flight levels. This procedure applies to the National Airspace System in the
United States. It does not apply to Warning Areas outside the U.S.
When the local barometric pressure is lower than 29.92 certain flight levels are not useable
below 18,000 feet MSL. Under these conditions, it would be futile to request or file one of those
flight levels as a cruising altitude. In case the correct altitude for two-way radio failure is
determined to be the "Minimum altitude converted if appropriate, to minimum flight level for
IFR operations..." the Flight Information Handbook contains procedures for determining the
lowest useable flight level when the barometric pressure is below 29.92.
307. ENROUTE PHASE
This section contains procedures for the enroute phase of a Radio Instrument event, and
describes activities which normally take place after completion of a departure and before
terminal activities commence.
Tracking
To describe a student's tracking responsibilities, a review of some common navigation terms is
in order:
1.  HEADING - The direction an aircraft is pointed, usually expressed in degrees magnetic
from North.
2.
TRACK - The flight path of an aircraft over the surface of the earth.
3.
COURSE - Intended track of an aircraft over the surface of the earth.
4.
ROUTE - a defined path consisting of one or more courses.
5.  BRACKETING - the changes of heading in the search for a drift correction angle which
will hold an aircraft on course.
RADIO INSTRUMENTS
3-19


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