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STUDENT GUIDE
VISUAL NAVIGATION
7.12.1.2.1.4. Change frequency (255.4).
7.12.1.2.1.5. Ensure checklists complete.
7.12.1.2.2. Just prior to route entry, typically just after the Two-minute Prior call for the
entry point direct the pilot to accelerate to the computed
Note:
indicated airspeed. The table located in the In-flight guide
Some refer to the steps at left
(see Figure 7-1) provides the correct indicated airspeed to
as "Mach, Clock, Squawk"
fly based on temperature. As the pilot accelerates, change
the aircraft transponder code to 4000, indicating an aircraft
at high speed in a formal military training route (MTR). Finally, brief the pilot on how
and where the clock will be started. An acceptable clock brief typically includes the
following:
"Crew, for low-level entry we will hack abeam the tree line on the peninsula now at 12
o'clock. The call will be "Ready, ready, NOW."
7.12.1.2.2.1. There are two approved methods to enter the low-level route:
!" irect: Visually extend your course line from your entry point to establish a point on
D
course about 5 NM (1 minute) prior. Maneuver your aircraft to cross that point on
course. Make BDHI corrections as necessary inbound to the entry point.
!" utbound Parallel: Fly abeam your entry point at a distance equal to one turn
O
diameter (about 4-5 NM for most aircraft). Fly the reciprocal of your first course for
one minute outbound then turn inbound. At the completion of your turn you should
be on course 1 minute prior to the entry point. Make BDHI corrections as necessary.
NOTE: Route entry is your responsibility and either method is acceptable. While the goal is to
enter on the altitude, airspeed and course for the first leg, there are situations where a modified
entry is necessary due to time, fuel or airspace constraints. Your instructor will brief these
exceptions.
7.12.1.2.2.2. Clock: With the entry point visible in front of the aircraft, pick a point
abeam it for starting the clock. Because the entry point is directly beneath the aircraft at
entry, the point abeam provides a visual reference for starting the clock. While one may
use a personal stopwatch, starting the aircraft's clock at entry is mandatory and the
priority.
7.12.1.3. Route Exit
7.12.1.3.1. After completing the low-level route, a common mistake is to become
complacent in the "post-target" environment. Do not forget the target is also a low-level
turn point! Immediately after target cross over give the pilot a heading, altitude, and
change the transponder code to 1200. As the aircraft climbs, prompt the pilot for the
Low-level Exit Checklist (T-1):
EXIT CHECKLIST
NAVAIDS - AS REQUIRED (P,CP)
Set in the appropriate NAVAID for continued navigation.
ALTIMETERS - "SET" (P,CP)
7-19


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