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CHAPTER THREE
IFR COMMUNICATIONS
300. INTRODUCTION
This unit will discuss phraseology and formats for voice reports necessary during instrument
flight. This chapter, coupled with the preceding units, provides an understanding of the entire
flight evolution. Differences that exist from VFR communications will be addressed. Emphasis
will be placed on enroute and instrument approach communication (TACAN, PAR, ASR).
Notice the slight difference in communications between operations conducted locally at NPA
(utilizing specific stereo routes) and when "on the road" (utilizing DD 175s).
301. IFR DEPARTURES
First, ATIS is obtained. The call to clearance delivery for an IFR flight plan will depend on
whether the clearance is requested via a DD 175 flight plan or a local stereo route. Recall that
airfield frequencies can be found in the IFR enroute supplement, SID, or approach plates.
Let's examine two possible situations and the respective clearance call:
1.
Sherman Field
a.
DD 175
The format is: "<Agency> Clearance Delivery, <call sign>, IFR, <destination>, on
request."
Example
KATT 812 is filed IFR via a DD 175 departing from NPA and landing at NAS New
Orleans:
SNFO/SWSO:
"Sherman Clearance Delivery, KATT 812, IFR,
Navy New Orleans, on request."
b.
Stereo routes
i.
Most military airfields have routinely flown flight plans permanently on file at
base operations. These flight plans are called "stereo routes" or "canned
routes". Utilizing stereo routes eliminates the need to file a DD 175 by the
aircrew, as base operations implements the route into the system from the flight
schedule. Stereo routes are identified by a coded NPA route number (e.g.,
NPA-123). In the case of a stereo flight plan, substitute the route number for
the destination. We include our route number to aid the processing of our
clearance.
IFR COMMUNICATIONS
3-1


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