Quantcast Call Signs - P-8060015

 

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SNFO/SWSO VOICE COMMUNICATIONS
CHAPTER ONE
7.  Know what to expect. As you progress through each flight, it becomes easier to predict the
required communication. Knowing what information to convey to ATC will result in smoother
and more concise communications.
8.  Use proper formats and terminology to assist you in making brief and concise
transmissions. Good phraseology enhances safety and is a mark of a true professional.
NOTE
Throughout the COMM FTI, you will find examples of both radar
and non-radar voice reports. However, it is not possible to cover
every possible voice report that may occur. It is up to the aircrew
to carefully listen to the radio and comply with instructions given
by ATC. If you are in doubt or confused by any instructions given
to you by ATC, you must request clarification of those instructions
before performing what may be the wrong maneuver.
103. CALL SIGNS
Controller Station Call Signs
1.
Most controllers will have discrete frequencies, meaning that this is the only controller that
will be operating on that frequency. The AIM advises using the full name of the ground station.
After initially contacting a station, however, it is not necessary to refer to a station by its full
name:
a.
Clearance Delivery
"XXX CLEARANCE DELIVERY"
b.
Ground Control
"XXX GROUND"
c.
Airport Tower Control
"XXX TOWER"
d.
Departure Control
"XXX DEPARTURE"
e.
Approach Control
"XXX APPROACH"
f.
FAA Air Traffic Control Route
"XXX CENTER"
Where "XXX" is the name of the controller, (e.g., Pensacola, Houston etc.).
2.
However, some controlling agencies do not have discrete frequencies. All Flight Service
Stations (FSS), for example, use UHF frequency 255.4 and are referred to as "RADIO". If you
merely transmit "RADIO" without stating a specific FSS, every FSS within hearing range may
respond. The following are examples of agencies whose call signs should not be abbreviated:
a.
FAA Flight Service Station:
"Anniston Radio"
"Gainesville Radio"
b.
Pilot to Metro Service (PMSV):
"Pensacola METRO"
TECHNIQUE AND TERMINOLOGY 1-3


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