Quantcast
Summary - P-8040075

 

Click here to make tpub.com your Home Page

Page Title: Summary
Back | Up | Next

Click here for thousands of PDF manuals

Google


Web
www.tpub.com

Home

   
Information Categories
.... Administration
Advancement
Aerographer
Automotive
Aviation
Construction
Diving
Draftsman
Engineering
Electronics
Food and Cooking
Logistics
Math
Medical
Music
Nuclear Fundamentals
Photography
Religion
   
   

 



FLIGHT TRAINING PUBLICATION (FLIP) STUDENT GUIDE
CHAPTER FIVE
Distances between fixes on " direct" flights, or distances along only a portion of a jet route
segment, can be measured by using a straight edge, marking off the distance, and applying the
marked off distance to the convenient scale at the bottom or the top edge of the charts. This
scale is divided into 50-mile increments with a 50-mile scale divided into 5-mile increments.
Compulsory reporting points are those points indicated by solid triangles on the chart.
When not in radar contact, position reports are required at these points, or any points listed on
your Flight Plan (DD-17S) which define your route of flight. The format for these reports is
found on the back cover of the IFR Supplement. Rules for position reporting will be covered in
the Voice Communications classes.
Those NAVAID identification boxes on your chart that are shaded to appear three-dimensional
indicate a FSS is present with the same name as the NAVAID. Standard FSS frequencies are
listed in the legend with additional VHF frequencies printed above the identification box. FSSs
serving other areas can be found by looking under the name of a particular airport or NAVAID
in the IFR Enroute Supplement.
It is not possible to include all military and civil navigation and radio frequency information on
the panels of each chart in addition to the route data shown. All data pertinent to an airport is,
therefore, contained in the IFR Enroute Supplement. NOTAMS should be examined for updated
information prior to planning each flight.
In controlled airspace, including Special Use Airspace, ATC is responsible for clearing an
aircraft and maintaining legal separation from other known IFR traffic. In uncontrolled airspace,
ATC has neither the authority nor responsibility for the control of air traffic; it is the sole
responsibility of the Pilot-In-Command to obtain clearance prior to filing his flight plan. "No
A/G" will denote Special Use Airspace with no air-to-ground communication facility controlling
it.
Summary
In this unit of instruction, we have discussed how the Jet Route system operates and how to
properly and accurately use the High Altitude Charts. The legend is broken down into four
different sections
1.
Airports
2.
Radio Aids to Navigation
3.
Air Traffic Services and Airspace Information
4.
Special Use Airspace
The charts provide the aircrews with a road map of the sky to accurately and safely guide them to
their destination.
ENROUTE HIGH ALTITUDE CHART 5-11


Privacy Statement - Press Release - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +