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INSTRUMENTS FLIGHT PLANNING
CHAPTER SEVEN
NOTE
Remember voice reception is only possible over VOR frequencies.
Pilot-To-Metro Service
Direct PMSV is available at most major Air Force bases and certain Naval and Marine Air
Stations. Consult the IFR Enroute Supplement for the location and UHF frequencies of these
stations. Communications are established by calling "(Base name) Metro" for example, "Oceana
Metro." When utilizing PMSV, you are talking directly to a military weather forecaster who can
assist you with any meteorological service available in his/her office. He/she is authorized to
update forecasts or to issue new forecasts. Maximum use of METRO briefing service when
airborne is encouraged. Their hours of operation can be found in the Flight Information
Handbook.
Pilot Reports
When ceilings are at or below 5000 feet and visibility is below 5 miles, or thunderstorms are
reported (or forecast), FAA agencies are required to solicit PIREPs. Air crewmembers are urged
to furnish cloud tops, cloud layers, location of thunderstorms, icing, and turbulence. Information
received is used to expedite traffic, to advise other aircraft and to aid in forecasting.
Additionally, PIREPS are usually requested by and given to a Metro facilities.
NOTE
In accordance with OPNAVINST 3140.32, PIREPs are given
under the following conditions:
1.
When requested.
2.
When any unusual weather conditions exist.
3.
When IFR approach and actual weather differs from that which was
reported.
4.
When missed approach is due to weather below minimums.
5.
When wind shear is encountered on approach or departure.
It should be noted that PIREPs do not have to deal specifically with weather. A PIREP is
essentially a report that is given on any radio frequency that informs others of any hazards to
aviation in general. This may be a simple report to the control tower that a runway has standing
water, or the braking action on a certain runway is good, poor, etc. Another PIREP may be given
to ground control informing them and all other aircraft that loose gear, FOD, etc. is obstructing
the taxi way. Remember PIREPs are informative. If you experience an unusual phenomena, or
note any situations that may be hazardous to any aircraft, tell somebody!
IN-FLIGHT WEATHER ANALYSIS 7-7


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