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INSTRUMENTS FLIGHT PLANNING
CHAPTER SEVEN
2.
Performance characteristics of the aircraft permit an enroute flight altitude above existing
or developing severe storms.
NOTE
It is not the intent to restrict flight within areas encompassed by or
adjacent to a WW unless storms have actually developed as
forecast.
Training Command Weather Warning
A CNATRA Aviation Weather Warning is similar to a WW and MWA. However, this weather
warning pertains only to Navy Aviation Training Command bases. While at VT-10/4, you may
never file into a CAWW for any reason. It is issued, generally, in the absence of a National
Weather Service Weather Warning. These warnings apply to training command aircraft and
generally cover the same weather conditions as a WW or MWA. Needless to say, when a
CAWW is issued, you should examine all aspects of your route of flight before T/O, just as you
would for a WW or MWA.
If you file a flight plan at a base other than a CNATRA field, a CAWW forecast may not be
available or briefed. If there is any chance of severe weather on your flight, check with NAS
Pensacola via Defense Switched Network (DSN) to determine if a CAWW is in effect.
704.
IN-FLIGHT WEATHER INFORMATION
AIRMET
In-flight weather advisories consist of two types: the AIRMET (WA) and the SIGMET (WS or
WST). Since AIRMETs apply to lighter aircraft, they are issued to cover moderate, potentially
hazardous weather. This includes the following:
1.
Moderate icing.
2.
Moderate turbulence over an extensive area.
3.  Extensive areas where visibilities are less than 3 miles and/or ceilings are less than 1000
feet, including mountain passes.
SIGMET (Convective and Nonconvective)
SIGMETs apply to all types of aircraft and are issued to cover the more severe types of weather.
Convective SIGMETs cover the following:
1.
Tornadoes
2.
Line of thunderstorms
3.
Hail of inch or more in diameter
IN-FLIGHT WEATHER ANALYSIS 7-5


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