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INSTRUMENTS FLIGHT PLANNING
CHAPTER ONE
104.
ENROUTE NAVIGATION SECTION
For a simulated flight to Moody AFB, in a T-34C, our route information will be:
1.  NAS Pensacola direct to Crestview VORTAC, V198 to Marianna, V198 to Tallahassee,
V198 to Greenville, and direct to the TACAN IAF at Moody AFB (VAD 006010). Our alternate
airfield is NAS CECIL.
2.
Preflight winds: 240/20 (at cruise altitude)
3.
Preflight winds at 5000 feet: 220/10
Based on your preflight altitude you must determine climb and cruise data from the flight
planning data charts below before completing the body of a jet log. The information required is:
1.
Climb time
2.
Climb fuel
3.
Climb distance
4.
Cruise fuel flow
5.  Cruise TAS (While in the Training Command, we always plan for 210 TAS for the
T-34C and 240 TAS for the T-6A. However, for this example, we will be using the TAS
obtained from your cruise charts.)
Since we climb to 15,000 feet, we can read the time, distance, and fuel from the appropriate
flight planning data charts in the appendices. The following example is how to interpolate if
needed, and uses T-34C data. For a climb to 15,000 feet, we do a direct interpolation of the
climb fuels listed between 14,000 and 16,000 feet. The time and distance could also be
interpolated from the Flight Planning Data Tables in Appendices B (T-6A) and D (T-34C):
1,000 = 1
16,000 14,000 = 2,000
15,000 14,000 = 1,000
2,000 2
53 - 46 = 7
7 X = 3.5
Therefore, we burn 46 + 3.5 = 49.5. All fuel estimates are rounded up to the nearest five pounds.
Hence, we burn up 50 lbs in climbing to 15,000 feet.
Now interpolating for time we get: 12 11 = 1
1 X = .5
Therefore, our time to climb to 15,000 feet is 11 + .5 = 11.5
Finally, interpolating for distance, we get: 27 - 23 = 4 4 X = 2 NM
Therefore, our distance covered in the climb is 23 + 2, or 25 NM.
We are now ready to figure out cruise data. To determine which fuel flow to use, we interpolate
in the CRUISE chart and find that 15,000 feet nets a fuel flow of 255 PPH. This yields a
constant TAS of 212 knots.
JET LOGS
1-5


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