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INSTRUMENT FLIGHT PLANNING
CHAPTER SEVEN
CHAPTER SEVEN
IN-FLIGHT WEATHER ANALYSIS
700.
INTRODUCTION
Some weather conditions are hazardous to flight. It is essential that you know what these
hazardous conditions are, where to find out about them and how to report them. Unfortunately,
there is nothing we can do to prevent the hazardous weather conditions from developing, but we
can avoid them and let others know about them. This section is designed mainly as a discussion
on weather analysis during instrument flight. Most of this information is taken from the
NATOPS Instrument Flight Manual.
701.
LESSON TOPIC LEARNING OBJECTIVES
TERMINAL OBJECTIVE
C.
Navigate an aircraft via visual references and navigational instruments with the assistance
of a flight instructor.
ENABLING OBJECTIVE
C.10  Evaluate observed and forecast meteorological conditions to avoid weather hazards and
enhance mission accomplishment, during simulator navigation trainer mission in accordance
with OPNAVINST 3710.7.
C.10.1
Interpret flight weather advisories and ATIS information.
C.10.2
Employ pilot-to-metro services (PMSV) when appropriate.
C.10.3
Recall OPNAVINST 3710.7 weather minimums for destination and alternates.
702.
PREFLIGHT ANALYSIS
In preparing for a flight, you always conduct your own analysis of the weather. You are
negligent in the performance of your duties if you accept an analysis or forecast which you do
not completely understand. The object of this analysis is to give you a complete picture of the
weather conditions and developments affecting flight along your route. It also enables you to
intelligently discuss any apparent discrepancies in the forecasts. Once in the air, you cannot
always consult the forecaster or the weather charts to understand the reasons for unexpected
changes. You must be able to determine the corrective action to be taken. At these times, you
rely on your knowledge, experience, and the information obtained before departure.
Before going into a weather office, know exactly what information you want. You need to know
the local weather at the time of T/O and during climb to altitude, enroute and its effect on aircraft
performance, and at your destination and alternate(s). The type of information needed varies
considerably depending upon whether you are flying a jet aircraft, turboprop, a piston-driven
propeller aircraft or a helicopter. The following is a general guide for your preflight weather
analysis.
IN-FLIGHT WEATHER ANALYSIS 7-1


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